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Midwest Finesse Fishing: November 2021

One of the 40 largemouth bass that Steve Reideler and his partner caught on Nov. 11. 

Nov. 1

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 1 outing with Gary Mitchell of Pauls Valley, Oklahoma.

Here is an edited version of his log.

From 8:00 a.m. to about 2:00 p.m., we fished at U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas. Gary is a newcomer to Midwest finesse, and he was interested in learning more about how to employ this technique more efficiently and effectively.

Area thermometers recorded the morning low temperature at 47 degrees. The afternoon high temperature was 77 degrees. The barometric pressure measured 30.21 at 8:00 a.m. and 30.19 at 2:00 p.m. The wind angled out of the southeast and east at 5 to 10 mph. The sky conditions fluctuated from being overcast to mostly cloudy.

The water displayed about two feet of clarity in most of the areas that we fished, but there was four feet of visibility in one feeder-creek arm. The surface temperature varied from 67 to 69 degrees. The water level appeared to be about three feet below normal.

We spent these six hours in the lower end of the reservoir. We targeted portions of five feeder-creek arms, four main-lake points, two islands, a 30-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline, and a water-outlet tower at the dam.

This reservoir's submerged terrain is comprised of mostly red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders. Many acres of the bays and feeder-creek arms are embellished with thick stands of flooded timber, brush piles, submerged stumps, and a few patches of American pondweed.

We caught 35 largemouth bass and five spotted bass in water as shallow as two feet and as deep as five feet.

Twenty-nine largemouth bass and five spotted bass were caught on a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat matched with a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Four largemouth bass were tempted by a three-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Jighead. Two largemouth bass were enticed by a Z-Man's blue-steel Finesse ShadZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

The pearl Baby Goat and three-inch Slim SwimZ rigs were employed with a steady swimming retrieve. The blue-steel Finesse ShadZ combo was utilized with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. Two of these black bass were caught on the initial fall of the Baby Goat rigs.

Fourteen black bass were caught from the perimeter of the first island, and six were caught around the second island. The islands are situated at the mouth of two feeder-creek arms. Their topography is flat, and their underwater terrains are composed of pea-gravel, chuck rocks, and few scattered boulders.

Fifteen bass were caught around flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock secondary points in the lower sections inside the five feeder-creek arms.

We also employed our side-imaging and 2-D sonar to scan 13 secondary points, five small coves, and three rocky shorelines in the middle and upper sections of these creek arms. We did not find any threadfin shad or black bass around these 21 locales. Therefore, we did not fish them.

Five largemouth bass were caught from one of the four main-lake points that we fished. This point is endowed with a few meager patches of flooded stickups that the other three points were lacking. All four points are flat and cluttered with pea gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders. We caught one from the second point, but the other two were fruitless.

Around the 30-yard stretch of a riprap-laden main-lake shoreline, we generated one subtle strike, which we failed to hook, and we temporarily hooked and lost one freshwater drum.

We scanned the area around a large concrete water-outlet tower, which is located near the center of the dam, with our sonar. We left it, without making any casts after we discovered that it was devoid of threadfin shad.

We had a difficult time locating with our side-imaging and 2-D sonar any significant concentrations of threadfin shad and black bass. The larger pods of shad with that we did locate were suspended eight to 10 feet above the bottom in 30-plus feet of water in the middle of the creek channels. We did not detect any black bass in the vicinity of those deep-water schools of shad.

Flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock points and shorelines in the lower sections of the feeder-creek arms were much more productive than steeper shorelines and points adorned with large rocks and boulders. We failed to locate any threadfin shad or black bass with our side-imaging and 2-D sonar in the middle sections and upper ends of the feeder-creek arms.

In conclusion, this was a stellar outing in our eyes. It was also the most black bass that Gary has ever caught in one outing. And though we implemented all six of the standard Midwest finesse retrieves during this outing, only two of them were effective: the steady swim and the swim-glide-and-shake retrieves.

Nov. 3

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 3 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 31 degrees at 7:53 a.m. and 50 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The wind was calm for several hours, and when it stirred, it angled out of the south, southeast, and northeast at 3 to 7 mph. The sky was fair from 12:53 a.m. to 2:53 p.m., and then it became mostly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.40 at 12:53 a.m., 30.40 at 5:53 a.m., 30.41 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.32 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 55 to 56 degrees. The secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about five feet of visibility. Portions of this reservoir used to be a rock quarry, and much of its underwater terrain is laden with big rocks, boulders, and significant ledges. Many of this reservoir's patches of American water willows are exhibiting their autumn demise.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 9:24 a.m. to 11:24 a.m., 9:49 p.m. to 11:49 p.m., and 3:11 a.m. to 5:11 a.m.

I made my first cast at 12:06 p.m. and my last one when I caught largemouth bass number 40 at 2:48 p.m.

In retrospect, I spent too much time fishing along the shoreline of the dam. It has about a 60-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are endowed with some small patches of coontail that are intertwined with filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with patches of American water willows, a concrete outlet tower, and some piles of brush. Ultimately, it yielded three largemouth bass. They were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-dramatic-shake presentation in about seven feet of water.

Five largemouth bass were caught along about a 75-yard stretch of a shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are intertwined with occasional patches of coontail and filamentous algae. It has a 30- to 55-degree slope. The water's edge is comprised of American water willows, overhanging trees, a stone bridge, and an array of laydowns. Two largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a very slow swim-glide-shake presentation in six to seven feet of water. Three were caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; one was caught on the initial drop; two were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation. They were caught in four to six feet of water.

Along about a 75-yard stretch of a flat shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir, the TRD HogZ rig inveigled 17 largemouth bass. It has a 25-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and some silt, which is endowed with occasional patches of coontail and a lot of filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with patches of American water willows, overhanging trees, about 25 feet of a concrete retaining wall, and some laydowns. Two of the 17 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the rig. The others were caught on either a swimming presentation or a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in three to 5 ½ feet of water.

I caught one largemouth bass along another flat shallow-water shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. It is about 100 yards long and has a 25- to 30-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and some silt, which is covered with several meager patches of coontail and wads of filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with a concrete retaining wall and cluttered with five docks. The TRD HogZ rig with a swimming presentation caught this largemouth bass in about five feet of water.

Along about a 125-yard stretch of another main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir, I caught 14 largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 40- to 60-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are embellished with a few patches of coontail and gobs of filamentous algae. Its water's edge is festooned with seven docks, a few patches of American water willows, several concrete and rock retaining walls, a few laydowns, and several overhanging trees. These largemouth bass were caught on the TRD HogZ rig on either a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation or a drag-and-shake presentation in five to about 11 feet of water. Two were caught adjacent to the docks. The others were caught around the gravel, rocks, and boulders.

Nov. 4

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 4 outing with Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

North-central Texas received its first foretaste of winter weather on Nov. 2 and 3 with several rounds of cold rainstorms, robust 25- to 55-mph northwesterly winds, and chilly daytime air temperatures that struggled to reach the upper 40s.

The sky was overcast on Nov. 4 until 3:17 p.m., then it became mostly cloudy with a few spells of sunshine. Area thermometers recorded the morning low temperature at 42 degrees. The afternoon high temperature was 59 degrees. The barometric pressure measured 30.37 at 11:00 a.m. and 30.24 at 4:00 p.m. The blustery winds had diminished substantially from the previous two days, and were light and variable during this outing.

We donned some of our winter clothing for the first time since late February as we plied a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 10:21 a.m. to 12:21 p.m., 10:48 p.m. to 12:48 a.m., and 4:08 a.m. to 6:08 a.m.

We fished from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The water was dingy from the recent rains and displayed about 14 inches of visibility. Usually, the water clarity at this impoundment varies from 18 to 24 inches. The surface temperature ranged from 63 to 66 degrees, which is 10 to 13 degrees cooler than it was during my outing on Oct. 25, when I fished at this reservoir with Roger Farish of Highland Village, Texas. The water level appeared to be about five feet below normal.

There is no aquatic vegetation in this reservoir. Its submerged terrain includes silt, red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders.

We targeted portions of four medium-size feeder-creek arms, four main-lake points, and one island in the southwest tributary arm. The black-bass bite was slow, but we managed to scrounge up 17 largemouth bass, nine spotted bass, and six white bass.

Twenty-four black bass and two white bass were caught in two to eight feet of water around flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock secondary points and two of their adjacent shorelines in the lower sections of the four feeder-creek arms. We failed to generate any strikes from another 14 rocky secondary points, five red-clay and pea-gravel flats, four coves, and five concrete boat ramps.

One largemouth bass, one spotted bass, and four of the six white bass were caught from the perimeter of an island at the mouth of one of the feeder-creek arms. Most of the shoreline of this island is flat, and consists of pea-gravel and chuck rocks.

We failed to elicit any strikes from the four main-lake points.

Eleven largemouth and spotted bass were allured by a Z-Man's mudbug TRD TicklerZ rigged on a pearl 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig and a steady swimming retrieve; five were tempted by a steady swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; another five were attracted to a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed on a chartreuse 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Jighead and a swimming retrieve; and five were induced into striking a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ fastened on a black 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

In conclusion, we failed to locate any threadfin shad or black bass in the middle and upper ends of the feeder-creek arms. The threadfin shad and black bass that we did encounter were scattered around flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock points and a couple of flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock shorelines adjacent to those points in the lower portions of the creek arms.

Nov. 5

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 5 outing with John Thomas of Denton.

Here is an edited version of his log.

We fished at our most problematic U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas.

The powder-blue sky was clear, and there was not a cloud in sight. The morning low temperature was 38 degrees, and the afternoon high temperature reached 60 degrees. The wind angled out of the southeast and south at 5 to 10 mph. The barometric pressure measured 30.32 at 11:00 a.m. and 30.20 at 4:00 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the fishing would be average on Nov. 5, and the most opportune periods would occur from 5:03 a.m. to 7:03 a.m., 5:32 p.m. to 7:32 p.m., and 11:47 p.m. to 1:47 a.m.

John and I fished from about 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The water level appeared to be about five feet below normal, which may be its new winter-pool level. The surface temperature ranged from 63 to 66 degrees. The water exhibited about two feet of clarity.

In the upper end of the reservoir, we focused our attentions on three major feeder-creek arms, six main-lake points, and portions of three minor creek arms.

The six main-lake points were fruitless.

The first major feeder-creek arm surrendered two largemouth bass and one spotted bass. The submerged terrain inside this feeder-creek consists of red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and a few submerged boulders. These bass were caught in two to five feet of water and were relating to flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock secondary points in the lower and upper ends of the creek arm. We also searched for shad and black bass in the midsection of this creek arm with our side-imaging and 2-D sonar around several other secondary points and a couple of small coves, but it was to no avail.

Inside the second major feeder-creek arm, we caught five largemouth bass. The submerged terrain inside this feeder-creek consists primarily of red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and a few submerged boulders. There is a large chunk-rock and pea-gravel secondary point in the upper end of this feeder creek, and it splits two smaller feeder creeks. This point is also endowed with meager patches of flooded stickups and a dilapidated concrete boat ramp. These five bass were caught from the end of the boat ramp in less than three feet of water. They were the only bass we located during this outing that were grouped up at one locale. We failed to elicit any strikes around five rocky secondary points, a rock bluff, and a large pea-gravel flat in the lower, middle, and upper sections of this creek arm.

The third major creek arm yielded three largemouth bass. The first one was caught from a large rocky flat at the mouth of the creek arm in two feet of water; the second one was caught in three feet of water from the end of a flat pea-gravel secondary point in the midsection of the creek arm; the third one was caught in two feet of water from a pea-gravel and chunk-rock shoreline in the upper end of the creek arm. We found some small pods of threadfin shad in the back end of a cove and around two rocky secondary points in the midsection of this creek arm, but we failed to encounter any black bass at these three places.

The first minor feeder-creek arm, which is located about a half of a mile east of the third major feeder-creek arm, relinquished two largemouth bass. They were caught in less than three feet of water from a pea-gravel and chunk-rock shoreline in the midsection of this creek arm. We also dissected two other flat shorelines, two rocky secondary points, and a small cove further back in this creek arm, but we did not elicit any strikes from these locales.

In the back end of the second minor feeder-creek arm, we caught one largemouth bass in two feet of water next to a flat red-clay and pea-gravel secondary point. We also fished around two steep and rocky secondary points and a pea-gravel and red-clay flat that are situated near the pea-gravel secondary point where we caught the largemouth bass, but we did not generate any other strikes at these spots.

Inside the third minor feeder-creek arm, which is where we launched our boat, we caught four largemouth bass from a flat pea-gravel and chuck-rock shoreline on the west side of the creek arm. This shoreline is about 60 yards long and is endowed with several flat secondary and tertiary points and a small cove. These largemouth bass were scattered along the lower and middle sections of this shoreline, and they were abiding in less than three feet of water. None of them were relating to any of the secondary or tertiary points or inside the small cove. We also failed to generate any strikes from the flat east-side shoreline.

In the lower end of the reservoir, we failed to catch a black bass or elicit a strike around a multitude of secondary points and pea-gravel flats inside two major feeder-creek arms.

In closing, we struggled to catch 17 largemouth bass and one spotted bass in five hours.

Eleven largemouth bass were enticed by a steady swimming retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ matched with a chartreuse 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. Five largemouth bass and one spotted bass were allured by a steady swimming retrieve with either a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a chartreuse 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig or a pearl Baby Goat affixed to a black 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial fall of a three-inch Z-Man's The Deal Slim SwimZ rigged on a black 1/10-ounce Z-Man's finesse ShroomZ jig. We employed several other Z-Man Midwest finesse offerings, but we were unable to generate any strikes with them.

Nov. 5

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 5 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 36 degrees at 7:53 a.m. and 66 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the east, south, and southeast at 3 to 28 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.18 at 12:53 a.m., 30.19 at 5:53 a.m., 30.23 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.14 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be about one foot above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 55 to 56 degrees. The water had an unattractive hue. The secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about two to 2 ½ feet of visibility. This reservoir's patches of American water willows are exhibiting their autumn demise.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 11:41 p.m. to 1:41 a.m., 4:58 a.m. to 6:58 a.m., and 5:27 p.m. to 7:27 p.m.

I made my first cast at 11:25 a.m., and until I executed my last one at 1:55 p.m., I tried to hide from the very gust-ridden wind. The combination of the wind and the reservoir's surface being laden with oodles of leaves in the somewhat wind-sheltered locales made for a trying 2 ½ hours of fishing.

Ultimately, I eked out one smallmouth bass and 15 largemouth bass, and I accidentally caught one crappie and two freshwater drum.

In years past, we used to go black-bass fishing for trout at this reservoir, and at times, we would tangle with an impressive array of rainbow trout. But I failed to elicit a trout strike on this outing.

The smallmouth bass and nine largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Five largemouth were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD HogZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Two largemouth bass were caught along about a 250-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a large feeder-creek arm in the upper half of this reservoir. This shoreline has a 45- to 80-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Its water's edge is adorned with patches of American water willows, scores of laydowns, wads of floating leaves, and many overhanging trees. The two largemouth bass were caught on back-to-back casts with the Finesse TRD rig adjacent to a patch of American water willows on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water.

The main-lake point of this large feeder-creek arm yielded two largemouth bass. Its shoreline has a 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Its water's edge is adorned with patches of American water willows. Portions of it were windblown. The two largemouth bass were caught on the wind-sheltered side of the point and adjacent to a patch of American water willows when I was retrieving the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water.

Along about a 100-stretch of a wind-blown main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir, I used a wind sock. This shoreline has a 30- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are cluttered with several large stumps. Its water's edge in endowed with patches of American water willows, a few laydowns, several PVC pipes, and some overhanging trees. As I strolled with the Finesse TRD rig and employed a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water around two PVC pipes, I caught a smallmouth bass.

Around a tertiary point inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm, I caught four largemouth bass on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in four to almost seven feet of water. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. It has about a 30-degree slope. The water's edge is lined with American water willows. These largemouth bass were caught from about seven to about 15 feet from the outside edge of the American water willows.

I caught two largemouth bass around a main-lake point in the lower half of the reservoir. It was partially windblown. It is endowed with a 35- to 40-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is lined with American water willows. Many floating leaves cluttered parts of this point. These largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about six to eight feet of water and about eight to 10 feet from the outside edge of the patches of American water willows.

Inside a medium-sized feeder-creek arm, I caught five largemouth bass along two of its three shorelines. This creek arm lies in the lower half of the reservoir. Its shorelines are lined with American water willows, several overhanging trees, two docks, and a few laydowns. Gobs of leaves floated on the surface along the edges of the American water willows and under the overhanging trees. These shorelines have a 25 to a 35-degree slope. Their underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders that are enhanced with several manmade piles of brush. Two of the largemouth bass were caught under some of the floating leaves adjacent to patches of American water willows, and they were caught on the TRD HogZ rig with a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. The initial drop of the TRD HogZ rig inveigled two largemouth bass in about five feet of water under a large overhanging tree. The fifth largemouth bass was caught on the TRD HogZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation adjacent to a laydown and a patch of American water willows in about five feet of water.

Nov. 8

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their Nov. 8 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 51 degrees at 6:53 a.m. and 72 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the southwest, south, and southeast at 7 to 23 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.04 at 12:53 a.m., 30.05 at 5:53 a.m., 30.07 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.02 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 55 to 56 degrees. The Secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about five feet of visibility. In the upper portions of this reservoir, many of its patches of coontail have disappeared, which usually creates problematic largemouth bass fishing.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 12:59 a.m. to 2:59 a.m., 1:31 p.m. to 3:31 p.m., and 7:15 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.

It was one of our typical conjugal and geriatric outings. We made our first casts at noon and our last ones at 2:30 p.m. But to our dismay, we struggled to tangle with 17 largemouth bass in 2 ½ hours.

We caught 10 largemouth bass along about a 250-yard stretch of a shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. This shoreline has a 25- to 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and some silt; this terrain is embellished with some meager patches of coontail and filamentous algae. Its water's edge is cluttered with 22 docks, a few patches of American water willows, a couple of patches of water primrose, many rock and concrete retaining walls, one major laydown, a few piles of brush, and several overhanging trees. A Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught one largemouth bass. A Z-Man's Canada-craw Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught four largemouth bass. Five of the 10 were caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. These largemouth bass were caught in water as shallow as 3 ½ feet and near the water's edge to as deep as 12 feet and 20 feet from the water's edge. One was caught adjacent to the side of a dock. Three were caught along the outside edge of patches of American water willows. One was caught adjacent to a retaining wall.

We caught seven largemouth along about a 300-yard stretch of a shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and silt that are intertwined with occasional patches of coontail and filamentous algae. It has a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is comprised of American water willows, overhanging trees, six docks, several concrete retaining walls, a stone bridge, and an array of laydowns.

These largemouth bass were caught on our green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD rigs. One was caught by strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation near a dock and around a patch of coontail in about five feet of water. Another one was caught near a dock with a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. One was caught on a swimming presentation near a patch of American water willows and a patch of coontail and filamentous algae in about three feet of water. Five were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to seven feet of water near the rocks and boulders that are cluttered along the bottom.

In the middle section of the reservoir, we elicited three strikes along two short portions of about a 350-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline and two main-lake points. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are embellished with a few patches of coontail and filamentous algae. This area possesses a 35 to 50-degree slope. The water's edge is endowed with some patches of American water willows, several overhanging trees, and scores of docks.

Endnote:

Patty and I had a short and rare Saturday outing on Nov. 6. She was hoping to tangle with some rainbow trout with our Midwest finesse rigs, which is a traditional autumn and early spring endeavor that we call bass fishing for trout. But to our chagrin, we failed to tangle with a trout. What's more, we struggled to catch two smallmouth bass and nine largemouth bass. In short, something has gone awry with our abilities to find and catch fish.

Nov. 9

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 9 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 53 degrees at 7:53 a.m. and 67 degrees at 2:53 p.m. The wind fluctuated from being calm to angling out of the northwest, northeast, north, and east at 3 to 9 mph. The sky was fair until 1:53 p.m., and then it became mostly cloudy and overcast. The barometric pressure was 30.10 at 12:53 a.m., 30.14 at 5:53 a.m., 30.13 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.09 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 56 to 57 degrees. The Secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about five to six feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 2:09 a.m. to 4:09 a.m., 2:40 p.m. to 4:40 p.m., and 8:24 a.m. to 10:24 a.m.

We rarely fish at the same reservoir two days in a row. But after Patty Kehde and I struggled to tangle with 17 largemouth bass on Nov. 8, I was provoked on Nov. 9 to revisit that community reservoir that befuddled us. Patty, however, elected to play bridge with three of her friends rather than joining me on another conjugal and geriatric endeavor.

Before I made my first casts at 11:30 a.m., I chatted with an ardent power angler who was about to make his last cast, and he reported that the largemouth bass fishing was horrendous. He had been afloat for three hours and had caught only one largemouth bass.

Upon hearing that tale, I was instantly disheartened. But by the time that I executed by my last cast at 3:10 p.m., my fish counter revealed that I had caught 42 largemouth bass, and nine of those 42 were caught in the first 24 minutes of the outing along a main-lake ridge and offshore hump in the lower portions of the reservoir.

The underwater terrain of this ledge and hump consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are humongous, and they lie in six to eight feet of water. These nine largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. One was caught on the initial drop. The others were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in four to eight feet of water, and one of those eight was caught while I was strolling and executing the drag-and-shake presentation.

Around a secondary point and along two short portions of two shorelines inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm, I caught five largemouth bass. The underwater terrain of this locale consists of gravel, rock, and boulders. They have a 20- to 35-degree slope. The shorelines are endowed with several docks, rock and concrete retaining walls, and a few patches of American water willows. The Finesse TRD rig and a swim-glide-and-shake presentation caught one largemouth bass around the secondary point in about five feet of water. Around one dock, the Finesse TRD rig caught three largemouth bass as I was strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation in five to eight feet of water. Adjacent to the edge of another dock, the Finesse TRD rig and a swim-glide-and-shake presentation caught a largemouth bass in about four feet of water. They were caught from about seven feet to 20 feet from the water's edge.

Along about a 30-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the middle portions of the reservoir, a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught two largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, which are somewhat interlaced with patches of coontail and filamentous algae. The shoreline is bedecked with one mammoth dock, a concrete retaining wall, and patches of American water willows. The TRD HogZ rig caught one largemouth bass as I was strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation around one of the dock's concrete pillars in about seven feet of water and 20 feet from the water's edge. The second largemouth bass was caught on a swimming presentation of the TRD HogZ rig over a patch of coontail and filamentous algae in about 3 ½ feet of water and about five feet from the water's edge.

Along about a 250-yard stretch of a shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir, I caught 14 largemouth bass. This shoreline possesses a 20- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally adorned with a few meager patches of coontail and filamentous algae. The water's edge is cluttered with a few patches of American water willows, 14 docks, sand beaches, concrete and rock retaining walls, and a few overhanging trees. One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's smelt Finesses ShadZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-shake presentation adjacent to a dock in about 10 to 12 feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught on a swimming presentation with the TRD HogZ rig around patches of coontail and filamentous algae in about three to four feet of water. The Finesse TRD rig caught 10 largemouth bass with a drag-and-shake presentation in six to 13 feet of water. They were caught from about eight to 20 feet from the water's edge.

The Finesse TRD rig caught five largemouth bass along about a 100-yard sketch of a shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders that are intertwined with occasional patches of coontail and filamentous algae. It has a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is comprised of American water willows, overhanging trees, three docks, a concrete retaining wall, a stone bridge, and an array of laydowns. The five largemouth bass were caught along the steeper portions of this shoreline. They were caught while I was employing either a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation or a drag-shake-and-pause presentation in six to nine feet of water. They were caught from about four feet to about 12 feet from the water's edge.

Seven largemouth bass were caught along about a 75-yard stretch of another shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally graced with minor patches of coontail and filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with rock and concrete retaining walls, seven docks, a few patches of American water willows, one patch of water primrose, several overhanging trees, and a few laydowns. One was caught on the TRD HogZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. The Finesse TRD rig caught five largemouth bass; one was caught on the initial drop in about four feet of water; the others were caught on a very slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to 10 feet of water. They were caught from five feet to 15 feet from the water's edge.

In conclusion, I fished more slowly and methodically than I usually do. What's more, I have joined Drew Reese's school of extremely light-line fishing. And since the submerged aquatic vegetation at this reservoir is disappearing, I spent a lot of time strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation in deeper water than I typically probe, which is a leisurely way to fish. The majority of the largemouth bass were scrawny creatures, but each one of them moved my fish counter as readily as a four-pound largemouth bass moves it. And much of my piscatorial joys stem from moving that counter with astonishing regularity. For a variety of reasons, our ability to get the counter to reach 101 largemouth bass in four hours has not been achieved for several years. Nowadays, our goal has diminished to moving the counter at least 10 times an hour, which Patty and I failed to do on our Nov. 6 and 8 outings. On this Nov. 9 outing, however, I was able to move the counter about 11 times an hour. To my surprise, largemouth bass number 42 weighed four pounds, two ounces. Since it was caught on my last cast, I took the time to weigh it and photograph it.

Nov. 9

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 5 outing.

Here is an edited version of his log.

I returned to the same U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas where Norman Brown of Lewisville and I fished on Nov. 4. I fished from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The black bass fishing in north-central Texas is beginning to wind down for the year, and it is becoming more difficult for us to locate and allure 30 or more black bass in an outing. This outing was a trying one, and I ended up splitting my time between chasing black bass and white bass inside five feeder-creek arms in the southern region of the reservoir.

The sky was overcast most of the day; then it became partly cloudy later in the afternoon. The barometric pressure measured 30.17 at 11:00 a.m. and 30.04 at 4:00 p.m. There was a brisk wind quartering out of the southeast at 15 to 20 mph. The morning low temperature was 58 degrees; the afternoon high temperature was 75 degrees.

The water displayed about 14 inches of visibility. The surface temperature varied from 64 to 67 degrees. The water level was five feet below normal.

Red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders make up the vast majority of this reservoir's submerged terrain. There are a few remaining stumps and stickups in the shallow-water areas, but since the Corps dropped the water level several feet to its winter pool, most of them are now on dry land.

During the first three hours of this outing, I struggled to catch nine spotted bass and six largemouth bass. During the last two hours, I decided to pursue white bass instead, and I caught 18 of them.

The few black bass that I encountered were abiding in three to five feet of water and within 10 to 15 feet of the water's edge around flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock secondary points in the lower sections of five feeder-creek arms. The white bass were also caught in the lower portions of the creek arms in three to five feet of water, but they were inhabiting wind-blown pea-gravel and chunk-rock flats with no remarkable features.

I did not cross paths with any black bass at six main-lake points, around 11 large concrete support columns underneath a railroad trestle bridge, and along an adjacent riprap-laden embankment on the north end of the bridge.

In sum, the black bass and threadfin shad were scattered. I was unable to locate any threadfin shad or black bass in the middle and upper ends of the feeder-creek arms.

The 15 spotted bass and largemouth bass that I caught were allured by a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The white bass were bewitched by a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ rigged on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Both of these rigs were employed with a steady and medium-paced swimming retrieve about a foot or two below the surface.

I also employed several other Midwest finesse rigs, but they were unproductive.

Nov. 11

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 11 outing with Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Norman and I journeyed to a north-central Texas' U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir, where we hoped to catch 30 or more black bass.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the best fishing would occur from 4:22 a.m. to 6:22 a.m., 10:35 a.m. to 12:35 p.m., and 4:48 p.m. to 6:48 p.m. It also noted that the fishing would be poor.

We fished from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The sky conditions varied from overcast to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The morning low temperature was 49 degrees. The afternoon high temperature was 70 degrees. The wind quartered out of the north-by-northwest at 10 to 20 mph, and there were some gusts that reached 25 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.13 at 10:00 a.m. and 30.09 at 3:00 p.m.

The water level was about five feet below normal. The surface temperature ranged from 63.7 to 64.8 degrees. The water exhibited 14 inches of clarity in the back of one feeder-creek arm and 30 inches of clarity inside four other creek arms.

We targeted portions of five feeder-creek arms and a small bay at the south end of the reservoir. The small bay and two of the five feeder-creek arms are situated in the east tributary arm, and the other three creek arms are located in the reservoir's west tributary.

Along the south-side shoreline of the small bay where we launched the boat, we caught four largemouth bass. They were relating to the outside edges of several thick patches of American pondweed in three to five feet of water. They were caught on a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32 -ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead and a steady-swimming retrieve.

From that small bay, we traveled a short distance to the south and fished portions of a major feeder-creek arm. There is a medium-size island located in the lower portion of this creek arm. Its underwater terrain is flat and consists of pea gravel, chunk rocks, and a few scattered boulders. We caught eight largemouth bass and one spotted bass in less than five feet of water from the west, south, and east sides of the island. They were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with the pearl Baby Goat rig.

We caught two largemouth bass from two flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock shorelines on the north side in the midsection and back end of this major feeder-creek arm. These two shorelines are identical; they are about 60 yards long and their water's edges are graced with thin patches of American water willows, American pondweed, some boulders, and a few flooded stickups. These two largemouth bass were abiding in two to four feet of water and five to 10 feet from the water's edge.

Inside this major feeder-creek arm, we employed our sonar devices to scan the areas around three rocky shorelines and five rocky secondary points on the south side of the creek arm, but we found no additional threadfin shad or black bass at these places.

Along a rock ledge that is situated at the mouth of the second feeder-creek arm, we found a few threadfin shad in five to 12 feet of water. At this spot, we caught two spotted bass in the vicinity of the ledge. They were caught in five feet of water on a swimming retrieve with the pearl Baby Goat and about 10 feet away from the ledge.

We caught one largemouth bass inside a small cove on the north side the second feeder- creek arm. It was abiding in four feet of water next to the outside edge of a large patch of milfoil. It was caught on the pearl Baby Goat rig and a steady-swimming retrieve.

After we finished fishing in the second creek arm, we traveled about four miles westward to the third creek arm. Inside this creek arm, we failed to garner any strikes from three pea-gravel shorelines and five rocky secondary points.

Next, we traveled another two miles to the west and ventured inside the fourth feeder-creek arm. This creek arm is endowed with a small island at its entrance. The submerged terrain around this island is flat. It is composed of pea gravel, chunk rocks, and patches of American pondweed. This island yielded five largemouth bass. They were inhabiting the shallow-water areas around the patches of American pondweed in three to five feet of water. We failed to elicit any strikes from a 50-yard section of pea-gravel shoreline on the north side of the creek arm.

The fifth feeder-creek arm, which is situated on the south side of the west tributary arm, was our most fruitful locale. It surrendered 17 largemouth bass. Six of them were caught around a steep and rocky shoreline on the east side of the creek arm. They were caught in six to 10 feet of water and 10 to 25 feet from the water's edge on the pearl Baby Goat rig with a steady-swimming retrieve. The other 11 bass were caught in the back end of this creek arm around several large mats of America pondweed and Eurasian milfoil in three to five feet of water. Seven were caught on a slow swimming retrieve around the outside edges of the patches of milfoil with a Z-Man's mudbug TRD TicklerZ affixed to a pearl 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig; three were enticed by a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve near the outside edges of the patches of milfoil with a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighread; and one largemouth engulfed the pearl Baby Goat rig on the initial fall next to a patch of American pondweed.

In conclusion, we caught a total of 40 largemouth and spotted bass. Twenty-nine of them were caught on a swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Seven were caught on a swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's mudbug TRD TicklerZ attached to a pearl 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Three were caught on a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ fastened on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and one was caught on the initial fall of the Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Nov. 15

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 15 outing with his cousin Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 42 degrees at 12:53 a.m. and 66 degrees at 2:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the south and southwest at 5 to 14 mph, and from 3:53 am. to 1:53 p.m., there were wind gusts that ranged from 17 to 24 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.03 at 12:53 a.m., 29.93 at 5:53 a.m., 29.93 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.91 at 3:53 p.m.

The water level was a few inches above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 51 to 52 degrees. The Secchi stick indicated that the water exhibited about five to six feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 7:03 a.m. to 9:03 a.m., 7:24 p.m. to 9:24 p.m., and 12:53 a.m. to 2:53 a.m.

We made our first casts at 9:50 a.m., and by the time we made our last ones at 1:58 p.m., our fish counter indicated that we had tangled with 52 largemouth bass.

One of them was caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig inveigled three largemouth bass. And 48 largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

During the first 12 minutes of this outing, we failed to engender a strike along a main-lake ridge and offshore hump in the lower portions of the reservoir.

Along one shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm, we caught four largemouth bass The underwater terrain of this area consists of gravel, rock, and boulders. The shoreline has a 15- to 35-degree slope. The shoreline is endowed with several docks, rock and concrete retaining walls, one laydown, and a few patches of American water willows. One largemouth bass was caught on the Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water and about 15 feet from the water's edge. The other three were caught on the Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; one was caught on a deadstick presentation in about five feet of water and 15 feet from the water's edge; one was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water and about 10 feet from the water's edge; one was caught on a straight swimming presentation around a meager patch of coontail in about 3 1/2 feet of water.

Along about a 300-yard stretch of a shoreline that lies in the middle and upper half of the reservoir, we caught 15 largemouth bass. This shoreline possesses a 20- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally adorned with a few meager patches of coontail. The water's edge is cluttered with a few patches of American water willows, 17 docks, some sand beaches, concrete and rock retaining walls, and a few overhanging trees. The TRD HogZ rig caught one largemouth bass adjacent to one of the docks in about six feet of water on a swim-and-glide presentation. The Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig caught two largemouth bass with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about 10 feet of water and more than 15 feet from the water's edge. The Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught 12 largemouth bass; one was caught on a deadstick presentation in about 12 feet of water and more than 20 feet from the shoreline; two were caught on the initial drop in three to five feet of water; eight were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in five to 12 feet of water from 10 to 20 feet from the water's edge; four of these 12 largemouth bass were caught adjacent to a dock.

A dozen largemouth bass were caught along about a 200-yard stretch of a shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. It possesses a 25- to 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally graced with very minor patches of coontail. The water's edge is lined with rock and concrete retaining walls, 17 docks, a few patches of American water willows, several overhanging trees, and a few laydowns. All of them were caught on our Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead rigs. One was caught on the initial drop in about five feet of water and near the water's edge. The others were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in six to 12 feet of water and many feet from the water's edge, and four of them were caught adjacent to the docks. The steeper sections of this shoreline were more fruitful than the flatter ones.

Our Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead rigs caught eight largemouth bass along about a 100-yard stretch of another shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders that are intertwined with occasional patches of coontail and filamentous algae. It has a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is comprised of American water willows, overhanging trees, three docks, a concrete retaining wall, a stone bridge, and several laydowns. One largemouth bass was caught along the flatter portions of this shoreline with a straight swimming presentation in about four feet of water. The other seven were caught along the steeper portions of this shoreline. One was caught on the initial drop near a patch of American water willows in four to five feet of water. One was caught on a very short deadstick presentation in about seven feet of water and between 10 and 15 feet from the water's edge. The others were caught on either a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation or a drag-shake-and-pause presentation in five to about eight feet of water. The five largemouth bass were caught along the steeper portions of this shoreline.

Along about a 300-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline that lies in the upper and middle sections of the reservoir, our Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead rigs caught 13 largemouth bass. This shoreline's underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally graced with some significant ledges and a few shallow-water and small patches of coontail and filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with rock and concrete retaining walls, scores of docks, a few patches of American water willows, and several overhanging trees. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop in about three feet of water near a rock and riprap retaining wall. Another largemouth bass was caught on a deadstick presentation in about eight feet of water and more than 15 from the water's edge. Eleven of the thirteen largemouth bass were caught on either a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation or a drag-shake-and-pause presentation in six to about 10 feet of water and from 10 to 20 feet from the water's edge. Four were caught adjacent to the docks.

Nov. 18

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 18 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 26 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 50 degrees at 1:52 p.m. The wind angled out of the northwest at 5 to 17 mph, and some gusts ranged from 20 to 26 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was high, registering 30.37 at 12:52 a.m., 30.42 at 5:52 a.m., 30.51 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.46 at 3:52 p.m.

The water level looked to be an inch or two above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 51 to 52 degrees. An algae bloom reduced the water clarity to two to 2 ½ feet.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 4:14 a.m. to 6:14 a.m., 4:41 p.m. to 6:41 p.m., and 10:27 a.m. to 12:27 p.m.

I made my first cast at noon and my last one at 3:00 p.m. Throughout those three hours, the wind gusts were troublesome. Moreover, I failed to wear a proper wardrobe to ward off the bothersome effects of the wind chill.

Several Thanksgivings ago, this reservoir used to yield a respectable bounty of largemouth bass for our grandkids to relish. But that yield has declined since 2015, and that decline has paralleled the many applications of aquatic herbicides, which eradicated vast patches of bushy pondweed, coontail, curly-leaf pondweed, and Eurasian milfoil.

But to my delight on this outing, I crossed paths with numerous shallow-water patches of Eurasian milfoil gracing several shorelines, but I failed to find any bushy pondweed, coontail, and curly-leaf pondweed. What's more, none of the shallow-water flats were adorned with any submerged aquatic vegetation, which was an essential ingredient to locating and catching significant numbers of largemouth bass from late November into March.

Since 2011, this reservoir's managers spent vast amounts of money trying to kill the Eurasian milfoil, which they castigated as an invasive species, with various kinds of aquatic herbicides. And those herbicides also killed the bushy pondweed, coontail, and curly-leaf pondweed.

Not only has the largemouth bass fishing become trying, but the water clarity has become dingier, and algal blooms have erupted with astonishing regularity.

Nowadays, this reservoir has two new managers, and here is hoping that they will elect to cultivate the submerged vegetation and maintain it manually rather than employing herbicides. We are suggesting that they read Fred Pearce's "The New Wild: Why Invasive Species Will Be Nature's Salvation" and Tao Orion's "Beyond the War on Invasive Species."

I spent the first hour and 30 minutes of this outing probing portions of the shorelines, tertiary points, and flats inside a major feeder-creek arm. These shorelines possess a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edges are lined with scores of docks, many patches of American water willows, some laydowns, a few concrete retaining walls, some overhanging trees, several manmade piles of brush, and an impressive array of shallow-water patches of Eurasian milfoil that coated the surface of some of the water's edges. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders.

During these first 90 minutes, it was a struggle to catch two dinky largemouth bass.

One was caught adjacent to a boat dock in about five feet of water as I was strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's pearl Finesse ShadZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

The second one was caught on a hump that consists of rocks and boulders and adjacent to another dock. It was caught on a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water. This tactic is called the "rock-and-dock pattern," which northeastern Kansas largemouth-bass anglers employ when a reservoir is devoid of submerged aquatic vegetation.

I spent the next 20 minutes searching inside several feeder-creek arms for areas that were not being waylaid by the wind gusts.

Ultimately, I found portions of two shorelines adjacent to a main-lake point and portions of two shorelines inside a major feeder-creek arm that I could fish somewhat comfortably. These shorelines have a 30- to 45-degree slope. Their water's edges are endowed with patches of American water willows, laydowns, piles of brush, a dilapidated beaver hut, many stumps, and several overhanging trees. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are humongous.

These areas yielded 11 largemouth bass. All of them were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Three were caught on the initial drop of the rig adjacent to patches of American water willows in three to about four feet of water. The others were caught as I employed a drag-and-shake presentation in four to seven feet of water. And one was caught when I executed a slight pause to the drag and shake. Four of them were caught while I was strolling and employing the drag-and-shake presentation.

Despite being delighted and thankful by crossing paths with a surprising number of patches of Eurasian milfoil, I was disheartened by the water clarity and by catching an average of only 4.3 largemouth bass an hour. Now I am hoping that I can find a reservoir or two before Thanksgiving arrives where our grandkids can catch at least 10 largemouth bass an hour.

Nov. 20

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their Nov. 20 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 35 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 58 degrees at 2:52 p.m. The wind angled out of the southwest, south, east, northeast, and southeast at 3 to 8 mph. The sky was fair until about noon, and then it became partly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.07 at 12:52 a.m., 30.08 at 5:52 a.m., 30.08 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.03 at 2:52 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature was 49 degrees. The water exhibited about five feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 10:31 a.m. to 12:31 p.m., 4:19 a.m. to 6:19 a.m., and 4:43 p.m. to 6:43 p.m.

On this short, conjugal, and geriatric affair, our focus was to find a fruitful reservoir where several of our grandkids can fish during the day before and two days after the Thanksgiving holiday.

We made our first casts at 1:18 p.m. and our last ones at 3:15 p.m. During this 117-minute outing, we caught 22 largemouth bass and accidentally caught two crappie.

Six largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead inveigled 16 largemouth bass.

We spent the entire time dissecting small portions of the shallow-water flats inside three feeder-creek arms. We focused on areas that are endowed with patches of brittle naiad, coontail, and sago pondweed.

We caught five largemouth bass inside a small feeder-creek arm. They were caught on the Finesse TRD rig in four to seven feet of water around patches of coontail. One was caught on the initial drop of the rig. One was caught on a short deadstick presentation. Three were caught on a slow swimming presentation.

On a massive flat in the back 10 percent of a major feeder-creek arm, we caught 15 largemouth bass in three to six feet of water around patches of brittle naiad, coontail, and sago pondweed. Five were caught on the TRD HogZ rig, and the Finesse TRD rig caught 10. Two were caught on the initial drop. Six were caught on a swimming presentation. Seven were caught on a swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation.

We spent the final 15 minutes of this outing by quickly probing a very small portion of a massive shallow-water flat in the backend of another major feeder-creek arm. For some unknown reason, it was a chore to find patches of submerged vegetation. But at about 3:08 p.m., we found some, and around a patch of sago pondweed in about five feet of water, we caught two largemouth bass. One was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig. The second one was caught on a swimming presentation with the TRD HogZ rig.

It is a chore this time of the year to catch substantial numbers of black bass in northeastern Kansas reservoirs. And shortly after we caught largemouth bass number 21 and 22, we surmised that our grandkids might be able to tangle with eight largemouth bass an hour by fishing around patches of brittle naiad, coontail, and sago pondweed that adorn several of the shallow-water flats inside this reservoir's six feeder-creek arms. But if the wind is testy, and it is predicted to be, it would be a chore to fish these flats. Therefore on Nov. 22 and 23, we will see if we can find some catchable largemouth bass at two community reservoirs where we can often find spots to hide from the wind.

Nov. 22

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their Nov. 22 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 28 degrees at 2:53 a.m. and 48 degrees at 2:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the north, northwest, northeast, east, southwest, and south at 3 to 10 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.35 at 12:53 a.m., 30.31 at 5:53 a.m., 30.28 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.20 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature was 51 degrees. The water exhibited from 3 ½ to five feet of visibility. The water is beginning to be blemished by a red or pinkish euglena bloom, which is known to kill submerged aquatic vegetation and fish.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 11:49 a.m. to 1:49 p.m., 12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., and 6:02 a.m. to 8:02 a.m.

This was another one of our short, conjugal, and geriatric outings. We made our first casts around 11:00 a.m., and our last ones around 1:00 p.m.

We caught four largemouth bass on a Z-Man's meat-dog TRD MinnowZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. We used a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead to tangle with 15 largemouth bass. Twenty-four largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

We spent the first hour probing some shallow-water patches of coontail and portions of a shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm in the middle section of this reservoir. This area has a 25-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks. The water's edge of the shoreline that we fished is adorned with some patches of American water willows, nine docks, two concrete boat ramps, and a few laydowns.

This locale yielded 21 largemouth bass.

The TRD HogZ rig caught seven largemouth bass, and the Finesse TRD rig caught 14 largemouth bass.

Six of the 21 largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. Four were caught around patches of coontail, about 15 feet from the water's edge, and in about six feet of water. Two were caught adjacent to the water's edge in about three feet of water.

Fifteen of the 21 largemouth bass were caught on either a swimming presentation or a swim-glide-and-minor-shake presentation. One was caught at one of the boat ramps. The others were caught around patches of coontail in five to six feet of water and many feet from the water's edge.

We spent the second hour fishing about a 100-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline and a main-lake point in the upper half of this reservoir. This area has a slope that ranges from 25- to 90-degrees. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are embellished with a few patches of coontail. The water's edge is laden with scores of laydowns, some patches of American water willows, and many overhanging trees and terrestrial vegetation.

This area yielded 22 largemouth bass.

The TRD HogZ rig caught one largemouth bass on a very slow swim-glide-and-minor-shake presentation a few inches above the bottom in eight to 10 feet of water and about 15 feet from the water's edge.

Four largemouth bass were caught on the TRD MinnowZ rig. Two were caught on a deadstick presentation in about six feet of water. One was in the vicinity of a laydown, and the other one was caught around a patch of coontail. The third one was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. The fourth one was caught near the outside edge of a patch of American water willows.

Our Finesse TRD rig caught 17 largemouth bass. Two were caught on the initial drop of this rig in four to six feet of water. The others were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in five to 10 feet of water. Four of the 17 were caught near the water's edge around either laydowns or patches of American water willows, and the others were caught from 12 to 20 feet from the water's edge and near the bottom.

In conclusion, we caught an average of 21.5 largemouth bass an hour.

Nov. 24

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 24 outing with his grandson Logan Cayton of Las Vegas, Nevada, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 54 degrees at 5:53 a.m. and 63 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The sky fluctuated from being fair to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 29.70 at 12:53 a.m., 29.70 at 5:53 a.m., 29.78 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.82 at 2:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the southwest and south at 6 to 22 mph, and it was gusty at times, reaching 39 mph. (But while we were afloat, the wind calmed down, and even became nearly nil around 3:00 p.m.)

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature was 51 degrees. The water exhibited three to four feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 1:44 a.m. to 3:44 a.m., 2:09 p.m. to 4:09 p.m., and 7:57 a.m. to 9:57 a.m.

We made our first casts at 12:05 p.m. Our last ones were made at 3:05 p.m. We spent about 20 minutes of these three hours replacing the T-H Marine Sure Foot Trolling Motor Foot Switch with a new switch.

We caught one smallmouth bass and 24 largemouth bass, and we accidentally caught two freshwater drum and three rainbow trout. In our eyes, one of the trout looked as if would weigh somewhere between five and seven pounds, and the battle that it provided us was a memorable and longwinded tussle.

We caught two largemouth bass on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The smallmouth bass and 22 largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

We caught three largemouth bass around one main-lake point and along a short portion of its adjacent shoreline in the upper third of the reservoir. The underwater terrain of this area consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edges are graced with patches of winter-dead American water willows and several laydowns. This area has a 35- to 60-degree slope. One of the three largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig next to a patch of American water willows in about three feet of water. Two largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water.

Along about a 100-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir, we caught one smallmouth bass and three largemouth bass. The underwater terrain of this area consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and a few stumps. This shoreline has a 25- to 45-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with patches of winter-dead American water willows, several laydowns, some overhanging trees, and several PVC pipes. One of the three largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a slow swimming presentation next to a patch of American water willows in about three feet of water. Another largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig around two PVC pipes with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water. The smallmouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water while we were strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation. The third largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig while we were strolling and working with a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water around a rock-and-boulder hump and a large stump.

Inside a small feeder-creek arm in the upper half of the reservoir, we caught five largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, a few boulders, and silt. The water's edge is embellished with patches of winter-dead American water willows and two overhanging trees. Around a significant tertiary point, we caught four largemouth bass. One was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig adjacent to a patch of American water willows in three feet of water. Three of the four were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water and many yards from the water's edge. Along a shallow-water shoreline and next to a patch of American water willows, the Finesse TRD rig caught a largemouth bass on the initial drop in 2 ½ feet of water.

Around a main-lake point in the lower half of the reservoir, we caught two largemouth bass. It has about a 40-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is embellished with thick patches of winter-dead American water willows. The largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in six to seven feet of water.

We caught eight largemouth bass along two shorelines inside a small feeder-creek in the lower half of the reservoir. These shorelines have a 30- to 40-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is lined with significant patches of American water willows, two docks, several overhanging trees, and a few laydowns. One largemouth bass was caught under one of the overhanging trees on the Finesse TRD rig in about four feet of water with a drag-and-shake presentation. One was caught adjacent to a laydown on the Finesse TRD with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water. The TRD HogZ rig caught two largemouth bass along the outside edge of the winter-dead American water willow patches with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught while we were strolling and using a drag-and-shake presentation parallel to the patches of winter-dead American water willows in five to eight feet of water. Another largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig next to a patch of winter-dead American water willows in about three feet of water.

Around a main-lake point and its adjacent shoreline, we caught three largemouth bass. This area has a 25-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. A few of the boulders are huge. The water's edge is lined with several docks and a few patches of winter-dead American water willows. One largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-shake presentation around one of the major boulders that adorn the point in about four feet of water. Another largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a swimming presentation in the vicinity of the same boulder. The third largemouth bass was caught along the shoreline with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water.

In conclusion, we caught an average of 9.6 black bass an hour.

Nov. 24

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 24 outing with Bill Kenney of Denton.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Bill and I conducted a five-hour excursion at a state reservoir in north-central Texas. This is a different state reservoir than the one we fished on Nov. 22.

This is a fairly new impoundment to us. Until this year, it was a reservoir that we drove by but always ignored. This was my fourth outing here and Bill's third. Neither of us have ever fished it during the fall months. So, we were eager to see what it would produce.

The last time I fished this reservoir was with Bill on Aug. 21. It was what we would consider an above-average outing for our neck of the woods. We hooked a combination of 23 largemouth bass and spotted bass, and we landed 20 of them. We also accidentally caught three channel catfish, one large green sunfish, and a bluegill.

Weather wise, the morning hours of Nov. 24 were overcast, but by 2:30 p.m., it was mostly sunny with a few thin clouds passing overhead. The wind was problematic; it blew incessantly out of the south and southwest at 20 to 30 mph, and at times, there were wind gusts up to 37 mph. The morning low temperature was 53 degrees, and the afternoon high temperature reached 73 degrees. The barometric pressure measured 29.99 at 10:00 a.m. and 29.90 at 3:00 p.m.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the best fishing would occur from 1:50 a.m. to 3:50 a.m., 8:02 a.m. to 10:02 a.m., and 2:15 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. It also indicated that the fishing would be poor.

We were afloat from about 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

We concentrated our efforts on a 100-yard stretch of a steep main-lake shoreline, a clay and pea-gravel main-lake flat and an adjacent rocky main-lake point, four other rocky main-lake points, one main-lake bluff, a long bluff situated just inside the mouth of a major feeder-creek arm, and the riprap-laden dam and its adjacent rocky shoreline.

The black-bass fishing started off slow, but it picked up in the afternoon. We employed eleven Midwest finesse rigs: a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a Z-Man's California-craw TRD HogZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a shortened 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Slim SwimZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ rigged on a black 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a Z-Man's Hot Snakes Baby Goat rigged on a chartreuse 3/16-ounce Z-Man's Trout EyeZ jig, a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Baby Goat rigged on a chartreuse 3/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead, a 3 1/2-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin EZ TubeZ rigged with a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead inserted inside the tube, a three-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Slim SwimZ underspin rigged on a chartreuse 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse ShadZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse TRD rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and a four-inch Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse WormZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. We also experimented with a Z-Man's pearl Finesse FrogZ rigged on a weedless 2/0 hook, a black-and-red 3/8-ounce skirted jig w/ a red-and-black craw trailer, and a small square-bill crankbait.

The water was stained and exhibited about 18 inches of visibility. The surface temperature was 59 degrees throughout the reservoir. The water level appeared to be a couple of feet low.

This reservoir has several varieties of aquatic vegetation: American water willows, American pondweed, yellow floating-heart, milfoil, coontail, and muskgrass. Most of it was dead or dying back except for a few patches of green milfoil that we found along a long shoreline inside one of the feeder-creek arms.

We caught two largemouth bass at a main-lake flat and an adjacent main-lake point. The shallow-water portions of this flat and the adjoining main-lake point are covered with several patches of dead yellow floating-heart stems, some dying patches of American water willows, and some American pondweed. The underwater terrain consists of clay, pea gravel, rocks, and a few submerged boulders. One largemouth bass was caught around the outside edges of the dead patches of yellow floating-heart and American pondweed in three to five feet of water. The other largemouth bass was caught from the end of a concrete boat ramp on the side of the rocky main-lake point in less than three feet of water. Both of them were caught on the Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

The other four main-lake points surrendered three largemouth bass and two spotted bass. These main-lake points possess 30- to 45-degree slopes and are graced with numerous large rocks and boulders. These bass were caught in three to five feet of water. Four of them were allured by the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation around and over the top of the submerged rocks and boulders. One was tempted by the 3 1/2-inch green-pumpkin EZ TubeZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

Along the main-lake rock bluff, we caught one largemouth bass. This bluff is located near the dam on the reservoir's north end. It is cluttered with overhanging trees, a few laydowns, large boulders, submerged tree trunks, and a rock ledge. This largemouth bass was suspended five to seven feet below the surface in 19 feet of water and about 30 feet from the water's edge. It was enticed into striking the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig and a swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

The other bluff is situated at the mouth of a major feeder-creek arm in the midsection of the impoundment. It is graced with a couple of laydowns, some large boulders, and many submerged tree trunks and stumps. This bluff and its adjoining 100-yard section of a pea-gravel and chunk-rock shoreline yielded a mixed bag of 13 largemouth bass and spotted bass. The shoreline is also cluttered with laydowns, boulders, submerged tree trunks and stumps, four boathouses, and a concrete boat ramp. Nine of the 13 black bass engulfed the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. Two of the 13 were enticed by the 2 1/2-inch green-pumpkin Slim SwimZ rig and slow swimming retrieve. One was induced into striking the 3 1/2-inch green-pumpkin EZ TubeZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. And another one was caught on a deadstick presentation on the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig.

One of the 13 black bass was caught about five feet below the surface in 21 feet of water at the end of the rock bluff. It engulfed the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ as it was being retrieved with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation. It was the only bass we caught from the rock bluff.

We caught the other 12 bass along the 100-yard section of pea-gravel and chunk-rock shoreline.

Nine of those 12 black bass were abiding around several small clay-and-pea-gravel tertiary points that are adorned with submerged stumps in less than five feet of water. The tertiary points are spread out along the 100-yard section of the shoreline. Two more largemouth bass were caught from the end of a concrete boat ramp in four feet of water. This boat ramp is located in the midsection of the pea-gravel and chunk rock shoreline. One was caught from a deep-water ledge in 23 feet of water and about 40 feet from the water's edge at the north end of this section of shoreline. We also caught three large crappie from underneath one of the four boathouses in 10 feet of water. These boat houses are located a short distance from the concrete boat ramp where we caught the two largemouth bass.

Along the wind-blown riprap dam, we caught one spotted bass. This dam is about 60 yards long and located on the reservoir's north end. It is endowed with a large concrete spillway, a medium-size concrete outlet tower, several laydowns, and some submerged stumps and tree trunks. This spotted bass was allured by the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ combo and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve in five to seven feet of water and about 15 feet from the water's edge. We failed to elicit any strikes from an adjacent 35-yard section of a rocky shoreline just west of the dam. The robust wind did not allow us to fish the areas around the spillway and concrete water-outlet tower.

We caught one channel catfish along a 100-yard section of a steep shoreline. This shoreline is located in the middle portion of the southeast feeder-creek arm. Its submerged terrain consists of clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders. This shoreline also has four rock retaining walls and six boat docks. This catfish was caught from the side of a large pile of rocks and boulders in five feet of water on the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig as it was implemented with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. We failed to catch any black bass from this shoreline.

In closing, we caught 13 largemouth bass, nine spotted bass, three crappie, two freshwater drum, and one channel catfish. The Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ combo was the most effective rig; it allured 17 of the 22 black bass that we caught. It was employed with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. Three bass were caught on the 3 1/2-inch green-pumpkin EZ TubeZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. Two are caught on the 2 1/2-inch green-pumpkin Slim SwimZ and a swimming retrieve.

Nov. 27

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 24 outing with his grandson Brady Cayton of Lawrence, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs. They were hoping that Brady's brother, Logan Cayton, could join them, but he had some other family obligations that preempted his time to fish.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 54 degrees at 5:53 a.m. and 63 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 29.88 at 12:53 a.m., 29.85 at 5:53 a.m., 29.95 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.95 at 2:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the south, west, northeast, and northwest at 6 to 16 mph, and at times, there were a few gusts that ranged from 24 to 30 mph.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 47 to 48 degrees. The water exhibited three to four feet of visibility.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 4:19 a.m. to 6:19 a.m., 4:29 p.m. to 6:29 p.m., and 10;30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

We made our first casts at 12:55 p.m. Our last ones were made at 2:55 p.m.

We caught 24 largemouth bass, and we accidentally caught one freshwater drum.

We caught eight largemouth bass on a Z-Man's PB&J TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught 16 largemouth bass.

We failed to engender a strike around three main-lake points, around three secondary points, and along a 25-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a large feeder-creek arm. These areas are located in the lower end of this reservoir.

Along three segments of a shoreline and around two secondary points inside a large feeder-creek arm, we caught 13 largemouth bass. They were caught on our Finesse TRD rigs. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders; some of the boulders are huge. This shoreline and its secondary points have about a 45- to 75-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with many overhanging trees, occasional patches of nearly winter-dead American water willows, and an array of laydowns. One of the largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig around a pile of rocks and boulders in about six feet of water. One was caught on a deadstick presentation in about six feet of water. The others were caught with either a drag-and-shake or a drag-shake-and-pause presentation in five to eight feet of water. All of them were caught from 10 to 20 feet from the water's edge.

We caught 11 largemouth bass along short portions of two shorelines inside a small feeder-creek in the lower half of the reservoir. These shorelines have a 30- to 35-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is lined with significant patches of American water willows, one dock, two overhanging trees, and a few laydowns. These largemouth bass were abiding about halfway inside this feeder-creek arm. Two largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig in about four to six feet of water with a drag-and-shake presentation. Nine largemouth bass were caught on the TRD HogZ rig. It caught two largemouth bass along the outside edge of the winter-dead American water willow patches; one was caught on the initial drop of the rig in about three feet of water; the second one was caught with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water. Seven largemouth bass were caught while we were employing a drag-shake-and-pause presentation parallel to the patches of winter-dead American water willows in five to about nine feet of water and many feet from the water's edge.

In short, we caught an hourly average of 12 largemouth bass. And Brady said he learned a lot about fishing for largemouth bass in cool-water conditions.

Nov. 29

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their Nov. 29 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 34 degrees at 1:52 a.m. and 71 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The wind angled out of the southwest, south, east, and northwest at 3 to 9 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.10 at 12:52 a.m., 30.00 at 5:52 a.m., 29.93 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.88 at 2:52 p.m.

The water level was a tad above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 46 to 47 degrees. An algae bloom has erupted at several locales around this reservoir, which has adversely affected the water clarity. The water exhibited about five feet of visibility at some down-lake areas and about 18 to 20 inches at some up-lake areas.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 5:45 a.m. to 7:45 a.m., 6:09 p.m. to 8:09 p.m., and 11:34 a.m. to 1:34 p.m.

Patty played tennis from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and then we headed to the boat ramp.

On this conjugal and geriatric outing, we made our first casts at 11:50 a.m. and our last ones at 2:15 p.m.

During the first 76 minutes of this two-hour-and-25-minute affair, we caught 15 largemouth bass. But during the next 69 minutes, we failed to catch a fish.

Five largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's PB&J TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. A Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught 10 largemouth bass.

We spent this outing quickly dissecting small portions of the shallow-water flats inside six feeder-creek arms and about 50-yards of the riprap shoreline of the dam. Inside the feeder-creek arms, we focused on the shallow-water flats that are endowed with patches of brittle naiad, coontail, sago pondweed, and manmade piles of brush.

On a shallow-water flat inside a tiny feeder-creek arm, we caught six largemouth bass. This flat is adorned with patches of coontail and disintegrating patches of brittle naiad. Its water's edge is graced with patches of winter-dead American water willows, laydowns, a few piles of brush, several stumps, and a huge beaver hut.

Two of the six largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig with a slow swim-and-slight-shake presentation in about six feet of water around patches of coontail.

Four of the six largemouth bass were caught on the TRD HogZ rig. One was caught on the initial drop in about three feet of water between the inside edge of a patch of coontail and the outside edge of a patch of American water willows. The other three were caught in five to seven feet of water around and near patches of coontail. One was caught on a deadstick presentation. Two were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-slight-shake presentation.

Across a portion of a massive flat in the back of a major feeder-creek arm, we caught five largemouth bass in three to six feet of water around patches of brittle naiad, coontail, and one manmade pile of brush.

One of these five largemouth bass was caught on the TRD HogZ rig, and four were caught on the Finesse TRD rig.

Three of the five largemouth bass were caught in about four feet of water around the manmade brush pile, which is intertwined with coontail. One was caught on a slow swimming presentation with the TRD HogZ rig. The other two were caught on the Finesse TRD rig; one was caught after the Finesse TRD rig was twitched off a branch of the brush pile; the second was caught on a slow swimming presentation.

One of the five largemouth bass was caught on a swimming presentation on the Finesse TRD rig in about four feet of water in the vicinity of some patches of coontail.

The fifth largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig around patches of brittle naiad and coontail in five to six feet of water.

Inside a small feeder-creek arm, we caught four largemouth bass around several manmade piles of brush in four to six feet of water. Some of these brush piles were enhanced with meager patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, which we failed to identify. We had a very sizeable fish hooked on a TRD HogZ rig, but it liberated itself by breaking the leader when the leader became entangled with one of the brush piles. Our TRD Finesse rigs caught the four largemouth bass with a swimming presentation in four to five feet of water.

After we caught these four largemouth bass, our geriatric bodies and minds failed to find and elicit another strike. It was a puzzling and bizarre outing. Thus, it was a struggle to catch an average of six bass an hour.

Nov. 29

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 29 outing with Rick Allen of Dallas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Rick Allen and I travelled to a north-central Texas' U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir. It is the same one where Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas, and I caught 40 black bass on November 11.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would occur from 5:53 a.m. to 7:53 a.m., 11:41 a.m. to 1:41 p.m., and 6:16 p.m. to 8:16 p.m. It also indicated that the fishing would be poor.

We fished from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

It was a beautiful fall day. The sky was cloudless, and the sun was intensely bright. The morning low temperature was 38 degrees; the afternoon high temperature was 75 degrees. The wind quartered out of the south-by-southwest at 10 to 15 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.21 at 10:00 a.m. and 30.06 at 3:00 p.m.

The water level was about five feet below normal. The surface temperature ranged from 57 to 58 degrees. The water exhibited 2 1/2 feet of clarity.

We began this endeavor at a wind-blown main-lake point at the entrance to a major feeder-creek arm. This main-lake point and feeder-creek arm are located in the middle section of the east tributary arm.

The main-lake point is flat. Its underwater terrain consists of red clay, pea gravel, a few submerged boulders, and some stickups. The top of the point is covered with four feet of water with 20-plus feet of water adjacent to its sides and end. One largemouth bass was caught from one side of the point in four feet of water on a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a black 3/32 -ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead and a steady-swimming retrieve.

Inside the feeder-creek arm, we failed to locate any threadfin shad and black bass along a rock ledge, four rocky secondary points, and a small cove.

From that feeder-creek arm, we moved to the southeast end of the east tributary arm. We explored two riprap shorelines, a riprap jetty, portions of a small bay, and sections of another major feeder-creek arm.

We failed to locate any black bass and threadfin shad along the first riprap shoreline and the adjacent riprap jetty.

The second riprap shoreline, which transitions into a main-lake point and forms the south-side entrance to a small bay, yielded one spotted bass. This spotted bass was caught from the main-lake-point portion of the shoreline in seven feet of water on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's watermelon-red TRD TicklerZ rigged on a red 1/16 -ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Inside the small bay, we caught one largemouth bass in four feet of water around a 20-yard stretch of another riprap-laden shoreline that is adjacent to a set of four concrete boat ramps in the midsection of the bay. This largemouth was caught near the riprap in four feet of water. It was enticed into striking the pearl Baby Goat rig and a steady swimming retrieve.

From that small bay, we traveled a short distance to the south and fished the lower end of a second major feeder-creek arm. A medium-size island is situated in the lower region of this creek arm. Its underwater terrain is flat and consists of pea gravel, chunk rocks, and a few scattered boulders. We caught one largemouth bass and one large freshwater drum in less than five feet of water from the west side of the island. The largemouth bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a Z-Man's perfect-perch Finesse TRD attached to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The freshwater drum was allured by the watermelon-red TRD TicklerZ rig and a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. The remainder of this island was fruitless.

We used our side-imaging and 2D sonar to scan three secondary points and a large flat on the south side of the creek arm. We failed to locate any shad or black bass around these four locales. So, we did not spend any time fishing them.

We also failed to locate any shad or black bass with our sonar around three main-lake points just south of the feeder-creek arm that we just fished, and around a large concrete water-outlet tower that is positioned near the center of the dam. Consequently, we did not make a single cast at any of these four spots, and we decided to move on to a main-lake island on the north side of the west tributary arm.

At the main-lake island, we located some small pods of threadfin shad around one side of the island with our side-imaging sonar. We slowly dissected that area with the pearl Baby Goat and the watermelon-red TRD TicklerZ rigs, but we failed to garner any strikes. We also failed to entice any strikes from the other sides of the island.

Next, we meandered to the south side of the west tributary arm and fished inside the south bay of another large feeder-creek arm. We caught 17 largemouth bass in this bay. Three were caught in five to eight feet of water from a steep and rocky shoreline on the east side of the bay. Thirteen were caught from a large pea-gravel and red-clay flat; they were associated with the outside edges of several large patches of green Eurasian milfoil in three to seven feet of water. And one largemouth bass was caught from another steep and rocky shoreline on the south end of the bay.

Ten of these 17 largemouth bass were caught on the Z-Man's perfect-perch Finesse TRD rig and a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve. Six were allured by a steady swimming retrieve with the Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat combo, and one was enticed by a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's pearl TRD TicklerZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

In sum, the black-bass bite was slow when we began the outing, but as the day progressed, the fishing improved and we caught a total of 20 largemouth bass, one spotted bass, and one freshwater drum in five hours.

Nov. 30

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Nov. 30 outing with Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported it was 43 degrees at 7:53 a.m. and 55 degrees at 1:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the north, northwest, northeast, east, southwest, and south at 3 to 7 mph; it became calm around 1:00 p.m. The sky fluctuated from being fair to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.04 at 2:53 a.m., 30.13 at 7:53 a.m., 30.19 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.10 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level was about normal. The surface temperature was 48 degrees. The water exhibited from 3 ½ to five feet of visibility. A red or pinkish euglena bloom discolored the water around some locales. And there was a greenish-brown bloom at other locales.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 6:25 a.m. to 8:25 a.m., 6:49 p.m. to 8:49 p.m., and 12:13 a.m. to 2:13 a.m.

We made our first casts around 9:50 a.m., and our last ones at 2:07 p.m.

On our first cast, we caught a largemouth bass, and we caught one on our last cast. At the end of this four-hour-and-17-minute outing, our fish counter indicated that we had caught 72 largemouth bass. We also caught one freshwater drum.

Four largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's smelt TRD MinnowZ affixed to a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig. A slightly shortened Z-Man's pearl Hula StickZ affixed to a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig caught five largemouth bass. A Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a black 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig caught 28 largemouth bass. A Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught eight largemouth bass. Twenty-seven largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-goby Finesse TRD affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

We spent the first 55 minutes probing some shallow-water patches of coontail and portions of a shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm in the middle section of this reservoir. This area has a 25-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks. The water's edge of the shoreline that we fished is adorned with some patches of American water willows, nine docks, two concrete boat ramps, and a few laydowns.

This locale yielded 25 largemouth bass. The Hula StickZ rig caught two largemouth bass. The TRD MinnowZ rig caught four largemouth bass. The TRD HogZ rig with the black jighead caught five. And the Finesse TRD rig caught 14 largemouth bass. They were caught on several presentation styles. Several were caught by strolling our rigs and employing a subtle swim-glide-and-shake presentation around and on the top of the patches of coontail in five to about seven feet of water. Three were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. One was caught on a deadstick presentation in about six feet of water. The others were caught on a slow swim-and-subtle-shake presentation in four to about eight feet of water. All but three of these 25 largemouth bass were caught many yards from the water's edge.

Along about a 100-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline and a main-lake point in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught 24 largemouth bass. This area has a slope that ranges from 25- to 90-degrees. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are embellished with a few patches of coontail. The water's edge is laden with scores of laydowns, almost a countless number of tree limbs, some patches of American water willows, and many overhanging trees and terrestrial vegetation. The Hula StickZ rig caught two largemouth bass. Nine largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse TRD rig. And the TRD HogZ rig with the black jighead caught 13 largemouth bass. Four were caught on the initial drop of our rigs in three to four feet of water. Five were caught while we were strolling and executing a drag-and-shake presentation in six to nine feet of water. The others were caught on either a slow swim-and-subtle-shake presentation or a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

We struggled to catch six largemouth bass around a main-lake point, along a combination of about a 150-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline and secondary shoreline, and on a shallow-water flat inside a medium-sized feeder-creek arm in the upper half of the reservoir. This area has a slope that ranges from 25- to 40-degrees. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and some silt; it is embellished with a few patches of coontail. The water's edge is endowed with laydowns, some tree limbs, several patches of American water willows, and a few overhanging trees and terrestrial vegetation. The Hula StickZ rig caught one largemouth bass around some meager patches of coontail on the shallow-water flat with a swim-and-slight-shake presentation in about six feet of water. The Finesse TRD rig caught one largemouth bass along the main-lake shoreline while we were strolling it and using a drag-and-shake presentation in seven to nine feet of water. Two largemouth bass were caught on the TRD HogZ rig with the black jighead with a slow swim-and-subtle-shake presentation in four feet of water around laydowns and tree limbs adjacent to the shoreline. The TRD HogZ rig with the blue jighead caught two largemouth bass around patches of coontail along a flat portion of the secondary shoreline with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water.

We fished along portions of about a 300-yard shoreline in the middle and upper sections of the reservoir, and about 85 percent of it was fruitless. Ultimately, we eked out 15 largemouth bass. This shoreline is adorned with several tertiary points. It possesses a 20- to 80-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are embellished with occasional patches of coontail. The water's edge is cluttered with oodles of laydowns, an array of tree limbs, patches of American water willows, and many overhanging trees and terrestrial vegetation. The TRD HogZ rig with the black jighead caught eight largemouth bass. The TRD HogZ rig with the blue jighead caught six largemouth bass. And the Finesse TRD rig caught one largemouth bass. Two were caught on the initial drop of our rigs; one was caught under an overhanging tree in about four feet of water, and another one was caught adjacent to a laydown in about four feet of water. The other thirteen were caught on either a swim-and-subtle-shake presentation or a drag-and-shake presentation in four to seven feet of water.

Largemouth bass number 71 and 72 were caught on a massive main-lake flat in the middle section of the reservoir. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, and it is embellished with several patches of coontail. The Finesse TRD rig caught these largemouth bass with a swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation at the outside edge of one of the patches of coontail in about nine feet of water.

In conclusion, we caught these largemouth bass at a variety of places and with a variety of presentations. During the first 106 minutes, we caught 45 largemouth bass. It took us 137 minutes to catch the next 27.

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