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Midwest Finesse Fishing: June 2022

Bear Brundrett of Valley View, Texas, with one of the largemouth bass that he caught on June 13.

June 2

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 2 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 51 degrees at 3:52 a.m. and 76 degrees at 2:52 p.m. The wind angled out of the north and northwest at 3 to 20 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.08 at 12:52 a.m., 30.06 at 5:52 a.m., 30.10 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.05 at 2:52 p.m.

During May, the watersheds of many of our community, federal, and state reservoirs in northeastern Kansas were pummeled with eight and more inches of rain. Most of it occurred during the latter part of the month. Our average rainfall for May is around 4.75 inches. These deluges have adversely affected the water clarity at many of our nearby flatland reservoirs. What's more, their water levels are well above normal.

On June 2, the water level at this state reservoir looked to be about four feet above normal. According to our Secchi stick, the water exhibited from about 15 inches to four feet of visibility, and that was much clearer than the water at many of the other reservoirs in northeastern Kansas. The surface temperature ranged from 70 to 73 degrees. This reservoir has acres and acres of shallow-water flats and shallow-water shorelines, and their underwater terrains are endowed with submerged patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and sago pondweeds. A horde of filamentous-algae coats much of the submerged aquatic vegetation, stumps, laydowns, and piles of brush – as well as the patches of American pondweeds, American water willows, and laydowns that embellish some of the shorelines.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 12:33 a.m. to 2:33 a.m., 12:58 p.m. to 2:58 p.m., and 6:46 a.m. to 8:46 a.m.

The largemouth bass fishing at this state reservoir has deteriorated dramatically during the past three years. It used to be an easy chore for us to catch from 50 to 75 largemouth bass on most spring, summer, and fall outings. Nowadays, it has become a struggle to catch 25. But our lunker-hunting colleagues might be pleased that the size of the largemouth bass has increased significantly. We, of course, are number hunters.

Until this demise, we used to spend many hours in April, May, and June probing the riprap shorelines that embellish this reservoir's dam and jetties, and we tangled with scores and scores of largemouth bass. But when those lairs became more and more trying, we began spending the bulk of our outings throughout the calendar year plying the offshore patches of submerged aquatic vegetation that grace this reservoir's shallow-water areas. And until this June 2 outing, these patches of vegetation have been the most fruitful locales at this reservoir.

I made my first cast at 11:50 a.m. and my last one at 1:50 p.m.

It is interesting to point out that 30 days ago my cousin Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, and I caught 116 largemouth bass in three hours, 50 minutes, at a nearby state reservoir. Moreover, Patty Kehde and I caught 60 largemouth bass in two hours and one minute 27 days ago at that same state reservoir.

Conditions have changed significantly, and it was a disheartening tussle to catch only 11 largemouth bass in two hours on June 2.

I spent about 90 minutes of this outing plying offshore patches of submerged aquatic vegetation around two main-lake points, along portions of five flat shorelines inside three feeder-creek arms, across three flats inside the three feeder-creek arms, and a shallow-water flat adjacent to the dam.

One of the shallow-water flats adjacent to one of the shorelines yielded three largemouth bass. One was caught on the initial drop of a Z-Man's Junebug TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig around patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and American pondweeds in about five feet of water. The other two were caught on back-back-to-casts with a shortened Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to five feet of water around coontail, bushy pondweeds, and American pondweeds.

I failed to elicit a strike around the two main-lake points, four shallow-water and flat shorelines inside three feeder-creek arms, a shallow-water flat adjacent to the dam, and across the portions of the three large shallow-water flats inside the three feeder-creek arms.

During the final 30 minutes of this outing, I caught a largemouth bass on my first cast with a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water along the riprap shoreline of a jetty. The Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ rig caught two more largemouth bass along the shoreline of this jetty with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to six feet of water.

Around the point and the two shorelines of another jetty, the Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation caught five largemouth bass in four to six feet of water.

Around four other jetties and along about a 60-yard stretch of the riprap shoreline of the dam, I failed to engender a strike.

June 3

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their June 3 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 50 degrees at 4:52 a.m. and 83 degrees at 2:52 p.m. The wind was calm for many hours, and when it stirred, it angled out of the northwest, west, and south at 3 to 9 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.03 at 12:52 a.m., 30.04 at 5:52 a.m., 30.04 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.98 at 4:52 p.m.

The water level at this state reservoir looked to be more than four feet above normal. According to our Secchi stick, the water exhibited about 15 inches of visibility in the back of one of this reservoir's feeder-creek arms, and there were five feet of visibility at the boat ramp, which is in the lower section of the reservoir, and it is much clearer than the water at many of the other reservoirs in northeastern Kansas. The surface temperature ranged from 75 to 79 degrees.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 1:58 a.m. to 3:58 a.m., 2:24 p.m. to 4:24 p.m., and 8:10 a.m. to 10:10 a.m.

We made our first casts at 2:30 p.m. and our last ones when Patty caught largemouth bass number 25 at 4:32 p.m. During this two-hour-and-two-minute outing, we also accidentally caught two channel catfish.

It is interesting to note that Patty and I fished this reservoir 28 days ago, and we caught 60 largemouth bass and seven crappie in two hours and one minute. Since that outing, some locales in northeastern Kansas, including this reservoir's watershed, have been waylaid with more than eight inches of rain. And the black-bass fishing at many of our reservoirs is out of whack. One of our community reservoirs has been whacked with blue-green algae.

We began the outing by fishing along about a 75-yard stretch of a steep main-lake shoreline, and we failed to catch a fish.

Around a main-lake point and along about a 700-yard stretch of a secondary shoreline inside one of the reservoir's feeder-creek arms, we caught 19 largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, some boulders, and a tad of slit. This terrain is entwined with massive patches of curly-leaf pondweeds, which are beginning their late-spring wilt and are being replaced by patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. The water's edge is graced with many overhanging trees, some laydowns, many patches of American water willows, and flooded terrestrial vegetation. The shoreline possesses a 20- to 45-degree slope and has several tertiary points. Many spots were shaded from the sun.

The 19 largemouth bass were caught on three Midwest finesse rigs. A Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig caught one largemouth bass along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. Eight largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's Junebug TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; two were caught on a deadstick presentation near patches of American water willows in about five to six feet of water; two were caught on the initial drop around patches of American water willows in about five feet of water; four were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to seven feet of water. Ten were caught on a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig: two were caught on the initial drop of this rig in three to four feet of water; eight were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation around patches of American water willows, submerged aquatic vegetation, and some flooded terrestrial vegetation in two to five feet of water.

We fished a small segment of a vast shallow-water flat in the back of this feeder-creek arm. This is endowed with patches of bushy pondweeds, coontail, and wilting curly-leaf pondweed. We caught one largemouth bass on the initial drop of the Finesse WormZ rig around a patch of bushy pondweed in about six feet of water.

Along about a 300-yard stretch of another secondary shoreline inside this feeder-creek arm, we eked out three largemouth bass. This shoreline possesses the same characteristics as the 700-yard stretch of shoreline where we caught 19 largemouth bass, but this shoreline was not shaded from the sun. Two of the largemouth bass were caught on back-to-back casts with the Finesse WormZ rig. They were caught on the initial drop of the rig between the outside edge of a patch of American water willows and the inside edge of a patch of curly-leaf pondweeds in about five feet of water. The third largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse WormZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water between the outside edge of the American water willows and amongst some patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

Around one main-lake point, we caught one largemouth bass. This point has about a 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are quilted with patches of bushy pondweeds, coontail, and curly-pondweed. The shoreline is lined with American water willows. This largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse WormZ rig along the outside edge of the American water willows.

We caught largemouth bass number 25 along about a 20-yard section of a shaded portion of a secondary shoreline inside another feeder-creek arm. This shoreline has a 25- to 40-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are embellished with submerged vegetation. The water's edge is lined with patches of American water willows, laydowns, overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and flooded vegetation. The largemouth bass was caught on the Junebug TRD TicklerZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water between the outside edge of a patch of American water willows and the inside edge of a patch of curly-leaf pondweed.

The highlight of this outing centered around field testing one of Drew Reese's five-foot, four-inch finesse rods. It is a customized Mud Hole NEPS78LMF-MHX Mud Hole rod blank. This one was assembled by the staff at Mud Hole Custom Tackle. We have been using Drew's rods since Nov. 4, 2021, and they have changed many of our perspectives about finesse fishing, and they are a great joy to use. They have added a new dimension of fun to our way of finesse fishing for black bass in northeastern Kansas.

June 3

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 3 outing with Rick Allen of Dallas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

June has started off wet in Texas. On June 1 and 2, a series of thunderstorms dropped more than three inches of precipitation across the north-central Texas countryside, and our reservoirs' water levels are now on the rise. A couple of them have now reached flood-stage levels.

On June 3, Rick joined me for an abbreviated outing at one of several U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in the Dallas-Ft. Worth metropolitan area. This is one of the reservoirs that has reached flood stage, but the boat ramps were still open.

It was overcast on June 3, and we were keeping an eye on some thunderstorms that were gathering in the west. The morning's low temperature was 66 degrees. The afternoon's high temperature was 80 degrees. The wind quartered out of the east and southeast at 5 to 12 mph. And while we were afloat, the barometric pressure remained steady at 29.96.

We fished from 7:20 a.m. to 10:50 a.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing periods would occur from 2:05 a.m. to 4:05 a.m., 8:18 a.m. to 10:18 a.m., and 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. It also indicated that the fishing would be poor.

The water was dingy, exhibiting between 12 to 18 inches of visibility. The surface temperature was 78 degrees.

When we arrived at the boat ramp at 6:45 a.m., we discovered that the water had risen significantly; it covered about 97-percent of the boat ramp. It had also collapsed the walkway of an adjacent courtesy dock and rendered the dock unusable. What's more, the numerous trees and bushes that are usually on dry land and bordering the water's edge are now flooded with two to three feet of water. Floating wood, leaves, and dead-grass debris littered a good portion of the water's surface where we fished, and at times, we were picking it off our lures after every cast.

We launched the boat at the north end of the reservoir and made our way to a main-lake island that is situated at the southeast end of the reservoir.

This island yielded five largemouth bass. Its underwater terrain is flat and composed of red clay, gravel, and some patches of boulders. Its shallow-water areas are also adorned with flooded terrestrial vegetation, laydowns, some standing timber, and stumps. We found a few scattered pods of threadfin shad around the island.

These five largemouth bass were caught in less than five feet of water from around a flat and rocky point on the west end of the island. Three of them were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with a three-inch Z-Man's space-guppy Slim SwimZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. The other two were enticed by a swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. We failed to garner any strikes around the flooded bushes, standing timber, stumps, and laydowns on the north, east, and south sides of the island.

From the island, we moved a short distance to the mouth of a major feeder-creek arm. We fished across a small clay-and-gravel flat and around a rock- and-boulder-laden main-lake entry point, and we caught one largemouth bass. It was caught from the side of the rocky main-lake point in about three feet of water. It was induced by the three-inch space-guppy Slim SwimZ rig and a swimming retrieve.

After that, we moved to the northeast region of the reservoir and probed another main-lake entry point to a minor feeder-creek arm, and a portion of a clay-and-gravel flat just inside the entrance to the creek arm. We shared this creek arm with another boat angler.

The main-lake point was fruitless.

The flat inside the creek arm yielded one largemouth bass. This flat's submerged terrain consists of red clay and gravel. There are a few patches of newly-flooded bushes and other terrestrial vegetation near its upper end. This largemouth bass engulfed the three-inch space-guppy Slim SwimZ as it was being retrieved with a swimming action through a narrow opening between two flooded bushes in three feet of water. We did not cross paths with any other black bass in this creek arm.

We finished the outing at the lower end of the dam, and it was our most productive spot. The dam is covered with riprap, and it forms the eastern boundary of the impoundment. It features a large concrete water-outlet tower that is positioned near the middle of the dam. Three boat anglers were dissecting the riprap around the outlet tower and just south of the tower when we arrived, but we remained on the lower end of the dam.

Along a 100-yard stretch of riprap, we caught 17 smallmouth bass, five largemouth bass, and one white bass. The bulk of these 23 fish were abiding in 10 to 15 feet of water and 10 to 25 feet out from the water's edge. They were scattered and caught many yards apart from each other. The 17 smallmouth bass and five largemouth bass were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a shortened Z-Man's Mud Minnow Hula StickZ matched with either a black 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig or a black 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. The white bass was caught on the three-inch space-guppy Slim SwimZ as it was foraging on shad on the water's surface in 25 feet of water.

In conclusion, the black-bass bite at this Corps' reservoir was pretty good despite the flooding conditions. We were unable to locate any significant numbers of largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass around the shallow-flooded bushes and laydowns, but the riprap on the dam was very productive.

All totaled, we caught 17 smallmouth bass, 11 largemouth bass, and one white bass in 3 1/2 hours. But as we were getting ready to trailer the boat, the Corps' was in the process of closing the boat ramp that we were using with barricades. So, we're not sure if any boat ramps will remain open or if the Corps will completely close down this reservoir until the flooding subsides.

June 7

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 7 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many state reservoirs. This is the same reservoir that he fished on June 2.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 69 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 86 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The wind was calm at times, and when it wasn't calm, it angled out of the north, northwest, northeast, east, and southeast at 3 to 15 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy to being cluttered with a few clouds. The barometric pressure was 29.87 at 12:52 a.m., 29.87 at 5:52 a.m., 29.88 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.86 at 3:52 p.m.

During the last nine days of May, I fished twice for a total of five hours and 40 minutes, and my partners and I caught 153 largemouth bass and 11 smallmouth bass. During the first seven days of June, I fished three times for a total of six hours and 16 minutes, and we struggled to catch 51 largemouth bass.

On this June 7 outing, the water level at this state reservoir looked to be about four feet above normal. According to the Secchi stick, the water exhibited from about 15 inches to 5 1/2 feet of visibility, and that was much clearer than the water at many of the other reservoirs in northeastern Kansas. The surface temperature ranged from 79 to 82 degrees. This reservoir has acres of shallow-water flats and shallow-water shorelines, and much of the underwater terrains of these shallow-water areas are endowed with patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, such as coontail, bushy pondweeds, and sago pondweeds. Wads of filamentous-algae coat much of the submerged aquatic vegetation, stumps, laydowns, and piles of brush – as well as the patches of American pondweeds, American water willows, and laydowns that embellish some of the shorelines. Wads of filamentous algae also float freely on the surface throughout this reservoir.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 5:19 a.m. to 7:19 a.m., 5:40 p.m. to 7:40 p.m., and 11:06 a.m. to 1:06 p.m.

I made my first cast at 1:36 p.m., and by the time I made my last cast at 3:36 p.m., the fish counter revealed that I had managed to eke out only 15 largemouth bass and one crappie.

I caught the first largemouth bass around 2:00 p.m. along a 125-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline. This shoreline has a 25- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, and some of this terrain is matted with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and filamentous algae. The water's edge is endowed with a few patches of American pondweeds and American water willows. The largemouth bass was caught on a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/20-ounce chartreuse Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water around a patch of bushy pondweeds and filamentous algae.

Because of the massive patches of aquatic vegetation, it was necessary to employ the swim-glide-and-shake presentation throughout the entire outing, and I suspect that about 30 percent of my retrieves became cluttered with aquatic vegetation.

I failed to elicit a strike around a main-lake point, around a riprap jetty, and across a small portion of a main-lake flat.

Along about a 100-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a medium-size feeder-creek arm, I caught one largemouth bass. This shoreline has a 25- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, and much of it is graced with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and filamentous algae. The water's edge is endowed with patches of American pondweeds and American water willows. The largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD TicklerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig in about 4 ½ feet of water along the outside edge of a patch of American pondweeds.

Across a shallow-water flat in the back of this medium-size feeder-creek arm, I caught one largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of silt, gravel, and rocks, and much of it is endowed with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, man-made piles of brush, and filamentous algae. The largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse WormZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water around patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

Along about a 125-yard stretch of a shoreline in the back half of a primary feeder-creek arm, I caught four largemouth bass. It possesses a 35- to 60-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are embellished with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, man-made piles of brush, and filamentous algae. The water's edge is lined with patches of American pondweeds, American water willows, overhanging trees, and laydowns. These largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse WormZ rig. Three were caught on the initial drop adjacent to laydowns in four to five feet of water. One was caught with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation around a patch of submerged aquatic vegetation in about six feet of water.

Around a flat main-lake point, I caught two largemouth bass. This point possesses about a 20-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are bespangled with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and filamentous algae. Its water's edge is lined with a significant patch of American water willows. These two largemouth bass were caught on a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/20-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water along the outside edge of the American water willows.

Around a secondary point inside a tiny feeder-creek arm, I caught two largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, which is littered with a stump, patches of bushy pondweeds, and filamentous algae. It has a 35-degree slope. The largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/20-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig in about four feet of water around a massive wad of filamentous algae.

I caught four largemouth bass across a massive shallow-water flat in the back of another primary feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrain consists of silt, gravel, and rocks, and much of it is endowed with patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, man-made piles of brush, and filamentous algae. A submerged creek channel courses across this flat. These four largemouth bass were caught along the outside edges of the patches of coontail, bushy pondweeds, and filamentous algae. They were caught in six to eight feet of water on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with the slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/20-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig.

June 7

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 7 outing with Mark Jarrett of Denton and his son Nathan Jarrett and 10-year-old grandson Luke Jarrett of Chandler, Arizona.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The Jarretts and I enjoyed a five-hour excursion at a rural state reservoir in north-central Texas.

The Jarretts are brand new to Midwest finesse tactics. Mark used to be an avid fly fisherman, but has not picked up a fly rod in quite some time. Nathan and Luke enjoy pursuing trout and catfish when they get the opportunity. This was their first introduction to the distinct advantages of employing Midwest finesse tactics and Z-Man's finesse jigs and Elaztech baits.

The sky conditions changed from being overcast to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. Area thermometers recorded the morning-low temperature of 75 degrees at 6:00 a.m., and the afternoon-high temperature of 95 degrees at 3:00 p.m. The wind quartered out of the southeast at 10 to 15 mph. The barometric pressure measured 29.70 at 7:00 a.m., and 29.75 at noon.

The water exhibited between 14 to 18 inches of clarity. The surface temperature ranged from 77 to 79 degrees. The water level was 2.58 feet below normal.

According to In-fisherman's solunar calendar, the most lucrative fishing periods would most likely occur from 5:29 a.m. to 7:29 a.m., 11:16 a.m. to 1:16 p.m., and 5:51 p.m. to 7:51 p.m. We fished from 7:00 a.m. to noon.

Our outing boiled down to targeting 19 black-bass haunts: three main-lake islands, 11 main-lake points, two riprap jetties, and two secondary points and a bluff shoreline inside a major feeder-creek arm.

Of the three islands, the first one we fished is situated in the southeast region of the reservoir, the second one is located in the reservoir's middle section, and the third one lies in the reservoir's northwest region. In our eyes, they all appear to be much the same with flat and rocky shorelines. Their underwater terrains are composed of red clay, small gravel, chunk rocks, and boulders. They are also adorned with some minor patches of flooded timber, stickups, bushes, and a few submerged stumps. They are encircled with deep water that is more than 20 feet deep.

The first island was not very productive. It yielded one largemouth bass, two white bass, and one channel catfish. The second island was more fruitful; it relinquished seven largemouth bass and five white bass. The third island surrendered two spotted bass and one channel catfish. They were caught in three to seven feet of water around aggregations of boulders in three to six feet of water.

The 11 main-lake points were the most lucrative areas. In total, they relinquished 15 largemouth bass, four spotted bass, one smallmouth bass, 11 white bass, one channel catfish, and one freshwater drum. These black bass were extracted from three to 10 feet of water around batches of large boulders mixed with chunk rocks and gravel.

We scanned two riprap-laden jetties and portions of a spillway channel that is located on the north end of this impoundment's east shoreline with our 2-D, down-scan, and side-imaging sonar, and we failed to locate any threadfin shad or black bass in this area.

Besides fishing around the main-lake points, islands, jetties, and spillway channel, we also meandered inside a major feeder-creek arm in the northwest region of this reservoir. About halfway back inside this creek arm, we scanned two large secondary points with our sonar, and they were devoid of shad and black bass. A short time later, we did find a good concentration of threadfin shad along a portion of a 100-yard long bluff shoreline in the upper end of the creek arm. But much to our chagrin, our best efforts produced only two subtle strikes, and we failed to hook those fish.

We caught 51 fish. Eighteen of them were white bass, two were channel catfish, and one was a freshwater drum. Thirty of them were black bass, which consisted of twenty-three largemouth bass, six spotted bass, and one smallmouth bass.

These 30 black bass were caught on three Z-Man Midwest-finesse rigs: sixteen were allured by a steady-swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. A Z-Man's hot-snakes TRD TicklerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig employed with a slow swimming presentation caught eleven. A steady-swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's hot-snakes Baby Goat rigged on a chartreuse 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig caught one.

The black-bass and threadfin shad were mostly scattered around the flat and rocky main-lake points and islands. And though we did find some paltry schools of threadfin shad in the major feeder-creek arm, we did not catch any black bass there.

As we were heading back to the boat ramp, Nathan informed me that this was the first time he has ever caught a largemouth bass or spotted bass. It was also the most fish he has ever caught in an outing. Luke also caught his first largemouth bass and spotted bass. Luke's largest bass was a largemouth bass, and it weighed three-pounds and four-ounces. And this was the most fish he has ever caught in one outing as well.

June 7

Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, filed a brief about his June 7 outing to one of northeastern Kansas' power-plant reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of his brief.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 66 degrees at 5:53 a.m. and 86 degrees at 4:53 p.m. The wind was calm at times, and when it stirred, it angled out of the south, southeast, north, and northeast at 3 to 12 mph. It rained 0.27 inches around 3:53 a.m., and then the sky fluctuated from being fair to partly cloudy to being occasionally cluttered with a few clouds. The barometric pressure was 29.77 at 12:53 a.m., 29.86 at 5:53 a.m., 29.89 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.87 at 3:53 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 5:19 a.m. to 7:19 a.m., 5:40 p.m. to 7:40 p.m., and 11:06 a.m. to 1:06 p.m.

The surface temperature was 79 degrees along the dam. At the boat ramp, which is inside the warm-water plume, the surface temperature was 84 degrees. The water was afflicted with an algae bloom, and it exhibited about 3 ½ feet of visibility along the dam. The level was a tad above normal.

When I arrived at the reservoir's gatehouse at 6:30 a.m., I was told the smallmouth bass fishing had been extremely slow. During the past week only 67 smallmouth bass had been caught. Until the largemouth bass virus waylaid this reservoir's smallmouth-bass population a few years ago, it provided Midwest finesse anglers in northeastern Kansas with many bountiful catches of smallmouth bass – as many as 101 in four hours on a few outings.

Nowadays, the white bass and freshwater drum are the dominant species that Midwest finesse anglers catch as they pursue the rare smallmouth bass.

I fished from 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and I caught 12 smallmouth bass, eight channel catfish, and a mixture of 19 freshwater drum and white bass.

The freshwater drum were not the lunkers that this reservoir is noted for, and the white bass exhibited a malnourished appearance.

Most of the 12 smallmouth bass were caught in two to three feet of water along gradual-sloping points and shorelines that are laden with rocks. They were caught on either a Z-Man's hot-snakes TRD MinnowZ affixed to a red 1/20-ounce mushroom-style jig or a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD BugZ on a black 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. I employed a swim-and-glide presentation.

June 9

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on June 9 with Bob Gum of Kansas City, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' many community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 58 degrees at 3:53 a.m. and 80 degrees at 12:53 p.m. The wind fluctuated from being calm to angling out of the west, southwest, and south at 3 to 8 mph. The conditions of the sky varied from being fair to partly cloudy to overcast to mostly cloudy. The barometric pressure was 30.04 at 12:53 a.m., 30.06 at 5:53 a.m., 30.06 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.02 at 2:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be about two feet above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 77 to 80 degrees. The water exhibited from about 15 inches to four feet of visibility. When Bob and I fished this reservoir on May 27, the visibility ranged from 3 ½ to seven feet of visibility. Since then, more than five inches of rain has pummeled this reservoir's watershed, and it washed a lot of murky water into it. The surface of the water in some areas was cluttered with small floating particles of bushy pondweed, bits of filamentous algae, and tads of other kinds of aquatic vegetation. We were surprised and pleased to cross paths with many burgeoning patches of bushy pondweeds, and we were also pleased to see that some of this reservoir's patches of coontail are exhibiting signs of resurrection. The coontail patches exhibited a significant decline in 2021.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 6:41 a.m. to 8:41 a.m., 7:04 p.m. to 9:04 p.m., and 12:30 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.

Before I hopped into Bob's boat, he had fished from 6:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. and caught 11 largemouth bass and six smallmouth bass, and one green sunfish. From 9:30 a.m. to 1:29 p.m., we caught 48 largemouth bass and 13 smallmouth bass, and we accidentally caught nine walleye, five freshwater drum, one channel catfish, one sunfish, and one green sunfish. (On our May 27 outing, Bob and I caught 82 largemouth bass and six smallmouth bass in three hours and 40 minutes.)

From 9:30 a.m. to 11:08 a.m., we fished along the riprap shoreline of the dam, along one main-lake shoreline, around two main-lake points, along one main-lake shoreline adjacent to the dam, and along two shorelines inside two small feeder-creek arms. The water at these locales exhibited from 3 ½ to four feet of visibility.

These areas relinquished seven smallmouth bass and 24 largemouth bass. They were caught on four Midwest finesse rigs: a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin ZinkerZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce black mushroom-style jig, a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's PB&J ZinkerZ affixed to a 1/20-ounce red mushroom-style jig, and a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD BugZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce black mushroom-style jig.

We caught seven largemouth bass and two smallmouth bass along the shoreline of the dam. It has about a 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain is laden with rocks, which are embellished with several man-made piles of brush and some occasional patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds. The water's edge has a few very meager patches of American water willows. One smallmouth bass and four largemouth bass were caught on the PB&J ZinkerZ rig in two to about six feet of water; one was caught on the initial drop, and the others were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. One smallmouth bass and three largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse WormZ rig in about five to eight feet of water by strolling and employing either a drag-and-shake presentation or a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation.

Along one of the shorelines inside a small feeder-creek arm, around one main-lake point, and along a main-lake shoreline, we caught nine largemouth bass and two smallmouth bass. These areas have a 35- to 60-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and many gigantic boulders. Some of this underwater terrain is adorned with patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail, and there are also a few man-made piles of brush. The water's edges are adorned with magnificent patches of American water willows, a few laydowns, and some overhanging trees. One smallmouth bass and five largemouth bass were caught on the Finesse WormZ rig with a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation either near the outside edge of the American water willows in about four feet of water or along the patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail in six to nine feet of water. One smallmouth bass and four largemouth bass were caught on the green-pumpkin ZinkerZ rig; one was caught on the initial drop along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in about four feet of water; the others were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation in five to nine feet of water.

Along a steep main-lake shoreline, around a main-lake point, and along a shoreline inside another small feeder-creek arm, we caught three smallmouth bass and eight largemouth bass. The main-lake shoreline has a 70- to 90-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Spots of this underwater terrain are embellished with some patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. The water's edge is lined with a few patches of American water willows, some overhanging trees, and laydowns.

The main-lake point and the shoreline inside the small feeder-creek arm have a 25- to 35-degree slope. The underwater terrains of the point and shoreline consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders; several of the boulders are very large, and black bass often abide around them.

The TRD BugZ rig with a slow swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation caught two smallmouth bass and three largemouth bass; two were caught on the initial drop adjacent to either a laydown or some boulders in about four feet of water; four were caught on a very slow swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation in six to 10 feet of water. Five were caught on the Finesse WormZ rig; two were caught while strolling and employing the drag-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water; three were caught on the swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six to nine feet of water.

In the lower half of the reservoir, we fished around two main-lake points, along about a 300-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline. We caught five smallmouth bass and seven largemouth bass. The water exhibited about three feet of visibility. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and it is endowed with occasional patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. Scores of the boulders are monsters; some of them are in piles; some created a variety of ledges. This area possesses a 25- to about 60-degree slope, and it is adorned with several tertiary points and one secondary point. The water's edge is laced with a few patches of American water willows, many laydowns, and a few overhanging trees. The green-pumpkin ZinkerZ rig caught two smallmouth bass with a slow swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation around one of the points in about five feet of water. Five largemouth bass were caught along the main-lake shoreline on the green-pumpkin TRD BugZ rig; two were caught on the initial drop in three to four feet of water around some boulders and laydowns; three were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six to nine feet of water. The Finesse WormZ rig inveigled one smallmouth bass and four largemouth bass; two of these black bass were caught on the initial drop of the rig in two to three feet of water around some boulders and laydowns; three of these black bass were caught while strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation in six to nine feet of water around rocks and boulders,

In the upper half of the reservoir, we caught 11 largemouth bass around a main-lake point and along a 300-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline. The water clarity ranged from about 15 inches to 24 inches. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are entwined with a few patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds. The slope of this terrain varies from 25 to almost 70 degrees. The water's edge is bedizened with some patches of American water willows, overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and laydowns. Two of the largemouth bass were caught on the PB&J ZinkerZ rig; one was caught on the initial drop under an overhanging tree, and the other one was caught on the initial drop along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows. The Finesse WormZ rig caught nine largemouth bass, and they were caught with a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation around boulders, laydowns, and patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds in four to six feet of water.

Around a main-lake point in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught one smallmouth bass. The water exhibited about 18 inches of visibility. It possesses a 25- to -40 degree slope. The underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are humongous, and they provide some significant ledges. This terrain is occasionally graced with some patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds. The water's edges are embellished with four metal poles, six laydowns, some patches of American water willows, several overhanging trees, and a few kinds of overhanging terrestrial vegetation. The smallmouth bass was caught on the Finesse WormZ rig while strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation around the rocks and boulders in about 10 feet of water.

Around a flat main-lake point in the middle section of this reservoir, we caught one largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, which are embellished with significant patches of coontail. It possesses a 25- to 30-degree slope. The largemouth bass was caught on the Finesse WormZ rig with a relatively fast-paced swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation around a patch of coontail in about seven feet of water.

We caught five largemouth bass along a flat shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and a few boulders. Parts of it are festooned with healthy patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. It possesses a 30-degree slope. Portions of the water's edge are lined with some riprap, patches of American water willows, a couple of overhanging trees, and five docks. These largemouth bass were caught around the patches of pondweeds and coontail in about seven feet of water, and they were caught on the Finesse WormZ rig with a relatively fast-paced swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation.

In sum, we caught an average of 15 black bass an hour. Once again, we relearned the importance of using a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation with a Midwest finesse rig around patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, and this time a relatively fast-paced retrieve was occasionally very productive. What's more, the Junebug hue is often our most effective color in stained waterways, and this is the time of the year in northeastern Kansas when the Finesse WormZ becomes one of our dominant rigs. In stained waterways, the Junebug one usually pays bountiful dividends.

June 9

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 9 outing with Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

From 7:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., we fished at a popular U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas. It is the same impoundment that we fished on May 27, when we caught 18 largemouth bass and seven spotted bass.

At 8:04 a.m., the sky conditions began to change from overcast to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The wind angled out of the northeast and east at 5 to 10 mph, and by noon, it was calm. The morning's low temperature was 72 degrees. The afternoon's high reached 95 degrees. The barometric pressure was 29.97 at 7:00 a.m. and 29.96 at noon.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar table, the best fishing would occur from 1:19 a.m. to 3:19 a.m., 7:31 a.m. to 9:31 a.m., and 7:55 p.m. to 9:55 p.m. It also noted that the fishing would be poor.

The water level was 2.03 feet above normal, which was enough to flood scores and scores of bushes, trees, and other types of terrestrial vegetation that line the shorelines and would normally be on dry land. The water displayed 15 inches of clarity in the reservoir's southwest tributary arm and 18 inches of visibility in the middle section of the east tributary. The surface temperature ranged from 78 to 79 degrees.

We spent the morning probing a slew of various black-bass haunts, such as points, shorelines, flats, a portion of an island, and a 50-yard segment of a riprap embankment that is connected to one end of an old concrete spillway. These areas feature submerged terrains of red clay, small gravel, chunky rocks, various sizes of boulders, and some riprap. Some areas were flat, and some were steep with gradients that ranged between 30- and 60-degrees.

Some of these places are adorned with gravel, rocks, and boulders, and they have very little or no flooded terrestrial vegetation. The areas that are not laden with rocks and boulders are strewn with numerous patches of flooded trees, bushes, laydowns, and tall grass. This miscellaneous collection of black-bass lairs is situated across an expansive seven-mile area that stretches from the west end of the reservoir's southwest tributary arm to the middle section of its east tributary arm.

We wielded a hodgepodge of Midwest finesse baits, and six of them were productive to a degree.

A shortened Z-Man's black-blue Hula StickZ rigged on a 1/16-ounce green-pumpkin-red-flake mushroom-style jig that was implemented with a steady-swimming retrieve was the most effective combo. It allured five largemouth bass and two spotted bass. A shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ matched with a chartreuse 1/20-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation enticed three largemouth bass and one spotted bass. One spotted bass and one largemouth bass were coaxed into striking a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat that was fastened on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig and employed with a moderately fast-paced swimming retrieve. A swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ fastened on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig induced one largemouth bass. A slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's hot-snakes TRD TicklerZ affixed on a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig beguiled one spotted bass. And a shortened Z-Man's Canada-craw Hula StickZ rigged on a 1/16-ounce green-pumpkin-red-flake mushroom-style jig bewitched one spotted bass.

We had a difficult time trying to establish a location pattern.

We caught three spotted bass from one flat and rocky main-lake point, and another spotted bass from an identical main-lake point that lies a couple of miles west of the first one where we caught three spotted bass. But we were perplexed that we could not garner a strike from five other identical rocky main-lake points. All of the steeper points were unproductive.

Four largemouth bass and two spotted bass were caught on a steeply-sloped main-lake shoreline that is about 100-yards long and endowed with scads of submerged boulders and chunky rocks. But two similar rocky shorelines were unproductive.

The south and west sides of a main-lake island produced three largemouth bass. We also crossed paths with a couple of medium-size schools of white bass that were briefly foraging on small threadfin shad on the surface of the water for a moment or two. But before these surface-feeding schools disappeared, we caught 15 of them in 25 feet of water and many yards away from the southeast end of the island. They were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with the pearl Baby Goat and black-blue Hula StickZ rigs.

We finished the outing at a long riprap-covered embankment that is connected to one end of an old concrete spillway. This section of embankment relinquished five largemouth bass on May 27, and this time, it surrendered three largemouth bass.

On our way back to the boat ramp, we stopped and investigated four main-lake points. These points are flat, and they have copious amounts of flooded trees and bushes. Several of the bushes had white egrets perched on their lower branches. We scanned these points with our side-imaging and down-scan sonar, but we did not locate any threadfin shad or black bass around these points.

To sum things up, the black-bass bite was humdrum. The largemouth bass and spotted bass, along with the threadfin shad, were scattered and made it difficult for us to catch a significant number of black bass. Ultimately, we eked out 10 largemouth bass and six spotted bass in 4 1/2 hours. They were caught from rock-and-boulder strewn lairs in water as shallow as two feet and as deep as eight feet. We were astonished that we were unable to locate any black bass relating to flooded bushes and other types of flooded terrestrial vegetation.

June 10

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their June 10 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 66 degrees at 5:52 a.m. and 85 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The wind was calm at times, and when it stirred, it angled out of the east, northeast, southeast, north, and west at 3 to 12 mph. The conditions of the sky fluctuated from being fair to mostly cloudy to overcast to partly cloudy to being cluttered with a few clouds, and a thunderstorm erupted around 3:52 a.m., and it rained lightly at 6:52 a.m. The barometric pressure was 29.91 at 12:52 a.m., 29.8 at 5:52 a.m., 29.89 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.83 at 4:52 p.m.

The water level at this state reservoir looked to be more than four feet above normal. The surface temperature was 80 degrees. The water exhibited from three to six feet of visibility. Most of this reservoir's vast patches of curly-leaf pondweeds have disappeared, which is a June phenomenon. These patches have been replaced by patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds, which are quite voluminous. This reservoir's shorelines are embellished with the most glorious patches of American water willows in northeastern Kansas.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 7:24 a.m. to 9:24 a.m., 7:48 p.m. to 9:48 p.m., and 1:12 a.m. to 3:12 a.m.

We made our first casts at 2:35 p.m. and our last ones at 4:35 p.m. During this two-hour outing, it was a chore to catch 18 largemouth bass and one channel catfish.

Along about a 500-yard stretch of a secondary shoreline inside one of the reservoir's feeder-creek arms, we caught 12 largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, some boulders, and a tad of slit. This terrain is entwined with patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. The water's edge is graced with many overhanging trees, some laydowns, patches of American water willows, and some flooded terrestrial vegetation. The shoreline possesses a 20- to 45-degree slope and has several tertiary points.

The 12 largemouth bass were caught on two Midwest finesse rigs. A Z-Man's The Deal TRD TicklerZ affixed to a 1/32-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead caught three largemouth bass along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows; one was caught on the initial drop in about four feet of water; one was caught with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water; the third one was caught on a deadstick presentation in about five feet of water. Eight largemouth bass were caught on a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ affixed to a 1/16-ounce baby-blue Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Two were caught on the initial drop of the Finesse WormZ in three to four feet of water. Six were caught on a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake in four to about six feet of water. Three were caught under the overhanging trees. Two were caught around some flooded terrestrial vegetation. Three were caught along the outside edges of the patches of American water willows.

One largemouth bass was caught around a main-lake point. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, boulders, and a variety of foundations from a farmstead. Some of this terrain is enhanced with patches of coontail and bushy pondweeds. The water's edge is lined with American water willows. The Finesse WormZ rig caught this largemouth bass in about eight feet of water on a drag-and-shake presentation on the rocks and boulders.

We caught one largemouth bass along about a 150-yard section of a secondary shoreline inside another feeder-creek arm. This shoreline has a 25- to 40-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are embellished with submerged vegetation. The water's edge is lined with patches of American water willows, laydowns, overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and flooded vegetation. This largemouth bass was caught on the TRD TicklerZ rig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows.

We caught four largemouth bass around another main-lake point. This point has about a 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are quilted with patches of bushy pondweeds and coontail. The shoreline is lined with American water willows. Two largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of the Finesse WormZ rig along the outside edge of the American water willows, and the other two were caught on the initial drop of the TRD TicklerZ rig along the outside edge of the American water willows.

Even though our catch rate was a paltry eight largemouth bass an hour, we were thoroughly and constantly entertained during this two-hour endeavor by thousands of hackberry butterflies that were flying every which way.

June 13

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on June 13 with his cousin Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' many community reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that the low temperature was 81 degrees around 6:53 a.m., and the afternoon's high temperature was 97 degrees. The wind angled out of the southwest and south at 10 to 36 mph. The conditions of the sky varied from being fair to partly cloudy to overcast to mostly cloudy; a thunderstorm and light rain erupted from 3:53 a.m. to 5:53 a.m. The barometric pressure was 29.71 at 12:53 a.m., 29.72 at 5:53 a.m., 29.71 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.71 at 1:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be about 12 inches above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 79 to 83 degrees. The water exhibited from about 10 inches to 40 inches of visibility. The surface of the water in some areas was cluttered with massive wads of floating coontail, which made us concerned about the state of this reservoir's patches of coontail. What's more, we failed to cross paths with patches of coontail at locales that used to contain immense patches of coontail. There were also small floating particles of bushy pondweed, bits of filamentous algae, and tads of other kinds of aquatic vegetation.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 9:49 a.m. to 11:49 a.m., 10:21 p.m. to 12:21 a.m., and 3:34 a.m. to 5:34 a.m.

We made our first casts at 9:30 a.m., and by the time we made our final casts at 1:30 p.m., our fish counter revealed that we had caught 26 largemouth bass, five smallmouth bass, and seven green sunfish.

All of the black bass were caught on either a four-inch Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig or a four-inch Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Both rigs were equally effective.

Along about a 400-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline and several of its tertiary points in the upper half of this reservoir, we caught three smallmouth bass and 17 largemouth bass. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are gigantic. Small segments of the underwater terrain are endowed with meager patches of coontail. It possesses a 25- to 70-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with untold numbers of overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and laydowns. There are a few patches of American water willows gracing this shoreline. One of the largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop adjacent to a patch of American water willows in about 3 ½ feet of water. One largemouth bass was caught on an accidental deadstick presentation a few feet from the outside edge of a patch of American water willows. Three largemouth bass were caught with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation around the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in four to six feet of water. The other largemouth bass were caught around the overhanging trees and laydowns on either the initial drop or a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to nine feet of water. The smallmouth bass were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in four to seven feet of water. We accidentally caught one largemouth bass twice, but we counted it only once; somehow this largemouth bass engulfed the Finesse WormZ rig again, which was in the water adjacent to the boat, when this largemouth bass was released.

In the lower half of the reservoir, we fished around two main-lake points, along about a 300-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline, around a secondary point, and along about a 70-yard stretch of a secondary shoreline inside a large feeder-creek arm. We caught one largemouth bass. The underwater terrains of these areas consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are gigantic. It possesses a 25- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with occasional patches of American water willows, overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and laydowns. The largemouth bass was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation around some rocks and boulders in nine to 10 feet of water along the main-lake shoreline.

Along about an 80-yard stretch of a steep shoreline adjacent to the dam, we caught two smallmouth bass and one largemouth bass. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and some it is graced with meager patches of coontail. It possesses a 40- to 90-degree slope. The water's edge is embellished with patches of American water willows, overhanging trees, and laydowns. The largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in about five feet of water. The smallmouth bass were caught on a drag–and-shake presentation around rocks and boulders in six to nine feet of water.

We failed to engender a strike along about a 50-yard stretch of the dam. We also failed to elicit a strike along about a 50-yard stretch of a shoreline and a shallow-water flat point inside a feeder-creek arm.

In the upper half of the reservoir, we caught four largemouth bass around two points and along a 300-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are entwined with a few meager patches of coontail. The slope of this terrain varies from 25 to almost 70 degrees. The water's edge is bedizened with overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and laydowns. Three of the largemouth bass were caught adjacent to patches of American water willows with a drag-and-shake presentation in five to 10 feet of water. One was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in the vicinity of two overhanging trees in about seven feet of water.

In the upper half of the reservoir, we caught two largemouth bass along a 75-yard stretch of a shoreline and across a small portion of a shallow-water flat inside a small feeder-creek arm. The shoreline has a 45- to 50-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, which are laced with a few patches of submerged aquatic vegetation. The water's edge is lined with laydowns, a few patches of American water willows, and several overhanging trees. The largemouth bass were caught strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation in seven to nine feet of water.

Along a short portion of a shallow-water shoreline and flat inside a small feeder-creek arm that is situated in the middle portion of the reservoir, we caught largemouth number 26. This shoreline has a 25- to 30-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with a few patches of American water willows, a stretch of riprap, and four docks. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, which are entwined with some patches of coontail and bushy pondweed. This largemouth bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation around patches of coontail in about seven feet of water.

Along two of the main-lake shorelines, we used a mega-size windsock at times to tame Mother Nature's windy and gusty ways. The weather forecasters are predicting that Mother Nature's windy and gusty ways will keep us at bay for a few days.

June 13

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 13 outing with Bear Brundrett of Valley View, Texas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Summer has arrived in north-central Texas. It arrived with triple-digit daytime temperatures and high humidity.

June 13 was one of these hot and humid days. The sun was intensely bright. The morning's low temperature was 84 degrees. The afternoon's high temperature soared to 103 degrees. The wind blew steadily out of the south at 15 to 20 mph. The barometric pressure remained somewhat steady. It measured 29.83 at 7:00 a.m. and rose slightly to 29.84 by 1:00 p.m.

From 6:50 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., we fished for black bass at one of several popular U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the prime fishing periods would most likely occur from 3:43 a.m. to 5:43 a.m., 9:59 a.m. to 11:59 a.m., and 10:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. The calendar also noted that the fishing would be great.

This reservoir's underwater terrain consists primarily of red clay, pea gravel, rocks, and large boulders. In the upper half of this reservoir, there are many acres of thick stands of flooded timber, laydowns, stumps, brush piles, and buck brush, and it is a laborious and time-consuming endeavor to navigate a boat through it. The lower end of the reservoir is less cluttered with standing timber, stumps, and brush piles. Instead, it is endowed with mostly chunk rocks and boulders. There are also several scarce patches of hydrilla and American pondweeds that are beginning to mat on the surface of the water on one main-lake shoreline. We chose to conduct this outing in the lower region of the reservoir.

The water level was at its normal level. The water displayed 2 1/2 feet of clarity. The surface temperature ranged from 79 to 81 degrees.

We caught seven largemouth bass inside a large feeder-creek arm in the southeast end of the reservoir. Six were caught in three to five feet of water from the south and west perimeter of an island that is located in the lower section of this feeder-creek arm. The other one was caught in three feet of water from a flat shoreline that is laden with chunk rocks and boulders. This shoreline is situated at the mouth of this creek arm. Six of them were caught on a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged to a blue 3/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The other one engulfed a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed on a black 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. Both of these rigs were employed with a steady-swimming retrieve near the sides of submerged boulders and patches of large rocks. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial fall of the Baby Goat rig next to a large boulder.

We caught one largemouth bass and one spotted bass in three to five feet of water along a 30-yard segment of a riprap-covered main-lake shoreline that is connected to the east end of a dam with a steady-swimming retrieve close to the riprap at the water's edge.

We also fished around a bluff-like main-lake point just north of the riprap shoreline, but we did not garner any strikes around it.

We slowly dissected portions of the east, center, and west sections of the dam. The dam is covered with riprap. A large water-outlet tower is positioned near the center of the dam. The tower is usually a productive spot, but not this time. The east and center sections of the dam were fruitless.

The west end of the dam was more productive. It relinquished eight largemouth bass, five freshwater drum, and one channel catfish. They were abiding in six to eight feet of water and 10 to 15 feet from the water's edge. One of the largemouth bass and a freshwater drum were inveigled by a Z-Man's white-lightning Finesse TRD fastened on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Another largemouth bass was enticed with a shortened four-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ. The other six largemouth bass, five freshwater drum, and one channel catfish were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ matched with a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. All of these lures were presented with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

Along three main-lake points and one riprap main-lake shoreline that are situated in the lower end of the east tributary arm, we caught one spotted bass. It was caught in three feet of water and about five feet from the water's edge near the riprap on the main-lake shoreline. It was caught on the initial fall of the pearl Baby Goat rig. We did not locate any largemouth bass or spotted bass around the three main-lake points.

In the lower end of the west tributary arm, we probed a 50-yard section of a flat pea-gravel and chunk-rock shoreline, an adjoining flat and rocky main-lake point, and portions of a floating tractor-tire reef just west of the main-lake point.

The main-lake shoreline and point were devoid of black bass, but we were able to eke out one largemouth bass from the floating tire reef. This largemouth bass was suspended about five feet below the surface in 27 feet of water, and about 10 feet away from one side of the tire reef. This largemouth bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with the green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rig.

At the mouth of another large feeder-creek arm in the midsection of the east tributary arm, we fished both sides and end of a prominent main-lake point, a shallow main-lake shoreline next to the main-lake point that is adorned with several large patches of hydrilla and American pondweed, a shallow clay-and-gravel rock ledge that runs parallel to the other side of the main-lake point and leads into the lower end of the feeder-creek, and a steeply-sloped rocky secondary point.

We failed to cross paths with any black bass at the main-lake point, around the outside edges of the patches of hydrilla and American pondweed on the flat clay-and-gravel main-lake shoreline, and around the steeply-sloped and rocky secondary point inside the creek arm. But the deep-water side of the shallow clay-and-gravel rock ledge relinquished two largemouth bass, one hybrid-spotted bass, two freshwater drum, and one channel catfish. They were tricked into striking the white-lightning Finesse TRD rig by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation near the deep-water side of the rock ledge. They were abiding in four to eight feet of water. We did not venture any further back in this creek arm.

In closing, I have not fished at this reservoir since May 31, when Norman Brown of Lewisville and I caught a total of 15 largemouth bass and seven spotted bass in seven hours. Bear and I fished for six hours during this June 13 outing, and we caught 19 largemouth bass, two spotted bass, and one hybrid-spotted bass. We also caught seven freshwater drum and two channel catfish by accident.

In sum, it was a puzzling four hours of fishing, and it was a struggle to catch an hourly average of 7.75 black bass.

June 16

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 16 outing with Rick Allen of Dallas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

On June 3, Rick joined me for a morning excursion at one of several U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas. This was one of the reservoirs that had reached flood stage on June 3, and when we returned to the boat ramp at the end of that outing, the Corps' was closing the ramp and putting up barricades. But overall, the black-bass fishing was pretty good. We caught a total of 17 smallmouth bass, 11 largemouth bass, and one white bass in 3 1/2 hours.

On June 16, Rick and I thought it would be fun to return to this same Corps' reservoir and seek out some more smallmouth bass.

It was partly cloudy and sunny. The morning's low temperature was 84 degrees. The afternoon's high temperature was 100 degrees. The wind quartered out of the south at 5 to 15 mph. The barometric pressure measured 30.01 at 7:00 a.m. and 30.04 at 11:00 a.m.

We fished from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar indicated that the fishing would be average, and the best fishing periods would occur from 12:46 a.m. to 2:46 a.m., 7:02 a.m. to 9:02 a.m., and 1:18 p.m. to 3:18 p.m.

The water exhibited about 18 inches of visibility. The surface temperature ranged from 80 degrees at the dam to 83 degrees at the boat ramp where we launched on the north end of the reservoir. The water level was still high, but showed signs that it was receding. It measured 1.70 feet above flood stage level.

After we launched the boat, we made our way to a main-lake island that is located at the southeast end of the reservoir.

We caught eight largemouth bass at this island. Its underwater terrain is flat, and it is comprised of red clay, gravel, and some patches of boulders. The shallow-water areas are cluttered with flooded terrestrial vegetation, laydowns, some standing timber, and stumps.

These eight largemouth bass were caught from around a flat and rocky point on the west end of the island in less than five feet of water. Three of them were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ rigged on a black 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. The other five were caught on a swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. We failed to locate any black bass around the flooded bushes, standing timber, stumps, and laydowns on the north, east, and south sides of the island.

From the island, we moved to the northeast end of the reservoir. There, we fished a 100-yard section of a wind-blown main-lake shoreline. The section of shoreline that we fished encompasses two gravel-and-clay flats and two minor points that are endowed with large rocks and boulders. Most of this shoreline was fruitless, but we did catch two largemouth bass in three to five feet of water that were relating to a cluster of boulders situated on the end of one of the two rocky points. Both of them were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a shortened Z-Man's green-pumpkin Hula StickZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

After that, we spent the remainder of this outing dissecting the submerged riprap along the dam, and it was our most productive locale. This riprap-laden dam forms the eastern perimeter of the impoundment. Its most prominent feature is a large concrete water-outlet tower that is positioned near the middle section of the dam. We opted to drift with the wind, and we fished from the south end to the north end.

The smallmouth bass and largemouth bass were scattered along the dam, and we would catch one here and there every few minutes. But by the time we finished, we had caught 17 smallmouth bass and five largemouth bass. We also crossed paths with one freshwater drum, one large green sunfish, a large bluegill, and one channel catfish.

These 26 fish were abiding in three to 10 feet of water and within 10 to 20 feet of the water's edge. Of the 17 smallmouth bass and five largemouth bass that we caught, 13 smallmouth bass and five largemouth bass were allured by a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with either the shortened green-pumpkin Hula StickZ rig or a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rigged on a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. Two smallmouth bass were enticed by a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD HogZ fastened on a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. The other two smallmouth bass were coaxed into striking an unaltered 4.75-inch Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse WormZ that was wacky-rigged on a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. This wacky-rigged worm combo was employed with a twitch-and-pause technique.

All told, the black-bass fishing at this Corps' reservoir was outstanding by north-central Texas standards. We caught a total of 17 smallmouth bass and 15 largemouth bass in four hours.

And while we were fishing along the dam, we spoke with another boat angler who was fishing around the large concrete water-outlet tower. He reported that he was having a slow day and had caught only two largemouth bass. Both of them were caught from the side of the water-outlet tower a few minutes before we spoke with him.

June 16

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a short log on the Finesse News Network about his June 16 and trying outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many state reservoirs.

Here is an edited version of his log.

I made my first cast around 2:15 p.m. and my last one around 3:45 p.m. And it was a struggle to catch nine largemouth bass, three bluegill, and one crappie.

The National Weather Service reported that the morning's low temperature was 73 degrees, and the afternoon's high temperature was 97 degrees. The wind was calm for three hours, and then it angled out of the south and southeast at 3 to 9 mph. After 3:52 a.m., the sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 29.95 at 12:52 a.m., 30.00 at 5:52 a.m., 30.03 at 11:52 a.m. and 29.98 at 3:52 p.m.

The water level at this state reservoir looked to be about 20 inches above normal. The water exhibited about 15 inches of visibility in the backs of two of this reservoir's primary feeder-creek arms, and there were 5 ½ feet of visibility at the boat ramp, which is situated in the lower quarter of the reservoir. The surface temperature was 83 degrees. I love bushy pondweeds, but every June many of this reservoir's shallow-water flats, points, and shorelines are blanketed with extremely thick patches of bushy pondweeds, and these patches are also covering many patches of coontail, sago pondweeds, and submerged piles of brush. Significant wads of filamentous algae are clinging to the bushy pondweeds. Near the water's edges, the bushy pondweeds are also invading some of the patches of American water willows and American pondweeds, which are also cluttered with filamentous algae. During the summer, these intense patches of bushy pondweed will eventually wilt. And that wilting will provide us with many more yards of these shallow-water flats, points, and shorelines for us to dissect with our Midwest finesse rigs, and we will catch scores of largemouth bass around the patches of coontail, wilted bushy pondweeds, and sago pondweeds.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 12:38 a.m. to 2:38 a.m., 1:11 p.m. to 3:11 p.m., and 6:45 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.

I spent about five minutes fishing around one main-lake point and making retrieves parallel to the outside edges of the patches of bushy pondweeds. And I failed to elicit a strike.

What's more, I failed to garner a strike as I spent about another five minutes probing the outside edges of the patches of bushy pondweeds on a shallow-water flat and around two piles of cedar trees inside a small feeder-creek arm.

Again, I failed to engender a strike while I fished around a significant patch of American water willows on a secondary point inside a primary feeder creek.

But I did eke out five largemouth bass from around the outside edges of the bushy pondweeds and a few wads of filamentous algae on a shallow-flat in the back of this primary feeder-creek arm. They were caught on a slightly shortened four-inch Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a swim-glide-and-incessant-shake presentation in seven to nine feet of water. Three of the five were caught on back-to-back casts.

Around a tertiary point and portions of its two shorelines about three-quarters of the way inside another primary feeder-creek arm, I caught four largemouth bass. This point has about a 45- to 50-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of clay, gravel, and rocks, which are intertwined with some patches of coontail. The water's edge is lined with overhanging trees, laydowns, some patches of American pondweeds, and two patches of American water willows. The initial drop of the Finesse WormZ rig caught one largemouth bass in about five feet of water near the outside edge of a patch of American water willows and American pondweeds. The Finesse WormZ rig caught the other three largemouth bass on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water.

I spent about 15 minutes fishing the outside edges of some of the thick patches of bushy pondweeds that grace a massive shallow-water flat in the back of this primary feeder-creek arm. If the largemouth bass are milling about inside these blankets of bushy pondweeds, it is an impossible task for us to reach them. And after failing to get a strike, I decided at 3:45 p.m. to go home.

June 17

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their June 17 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' many community reservoirs. It was a short endeavor, beginning at 9:45 a.m. and ending at 11:10 a.m.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that the morning's low was 74 degrees. It was 93 degrees at 11:52 a.m. From 12:52 a.m. to 6:52 a.m., the wind angled out of the south, southeast, northeast, and east at 5 to 28 mph. From 7:52 a.m. to 11:52 a.m., the wind angled out of the south at 7 to 12 mph. The sky was fair from 5:52 a.m. to 11:52 a.m., and before that time, it fluctuated from being mostly cloudy to overcast, and it rained lightly around 1:52 a.m. The barometric pressure was 30.02 at 12:52 a.m., 30.11 at 5:52 a.m., and 30.07 at 11:52 a.m.

The water level at this community reservoir looked to be about 12 inches above normal. The water exhibited about 15 inches of visibility halfway inside one of this reservoir's feeder-creek arms, and there were four feet of visibility along the dam. The surface temperature was 83 degrees.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 1:49 a.m. to 3:49 a.m., 2:19 p.m. to 4:19 p.m., and 8:04 a.m. to 10:04 a.m.

During this one-hour-and-25-minute outing, we caught 17 largemouth bass and accidentally caught 17 green sunfish, three channel catfish, and one crappie.

We caught 14 largemouth bass around the shoreline of the spillway adjacent to the dam, along the entire shoreline of the dam, along a short stretch of a main-lake shoreline adjacent to the dam, and along about a 100-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a large feeder-creek near the dam. The spillway has a 25- to 30-degree slope. The dam has about a 60-degree slope. The main-lake shoreline has a 45-degree slope. The shoreline inside the large feeder-creek arm has a 35- to 45-degree slope. The underwater terrains consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The shoreline inside the large feeder-creek has a hump the size of a tennis court that consists of a pile of humongous boulders and several gargantuan stumps. The water's edge of the dam has a concrete outlet tower, many patches of American water willows, which are blooming, and a few partially submerged logs and piles of brush. The water's edges of the spillway, the main-lake shoreline, and the shoreline inside the large feeder creek are lined with thick patches of American water willows. Five of the largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD BugZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. Nine largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's Junebug Finesse WormZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The TRD BugZ rig caught one largemouth bass on the initial drop near the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in about four feet of water. The Finesse WormZ rig caught one largemouth bass on a deadstick presentation in seven to 10 feet of water. The other 12 were caught as we employed a drag-and-shake presentation in about six to 12 feet of water. Three of these 12 were caught on the large hump that consists of a pile of humongous boulders and several gargantuan stumps inside the large feeder-creek arm. All but two of the largemouth bass were caught from 10 to 25 feet from the water's edge.

As we quickly fished along about a 100-yard stretch of a shoreline inside a primary feeder-creek arm, we caught two largemouth bass. The water exhibited about 15 inches of visibility. This shoreline has a 35- to 45-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and occasional boulders. The water's edge is embellished with patches of American water willows, laydowns, some piles of brush, and several overhanging trees. The two largemouth bass were caught on the TRD BugZ. One was caught near a laydown and a patch of American water willows with a drag-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water. The second one was caught while strolling and employing a drag-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water.

And we caught largemouth bass number 17 around a dock situated on a hump inside another feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks, which are enhanced with patches of Eurasian milfoil. The TRD BugZ rig caught the largemouth bass with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation adjacent to the side of the dock and around some of the patches of Eurasian milfoil.

June 20

Pat and Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about their June 20 outing at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs. It was one of their old-codgers' endeavors, which are usually 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours long.

Here is an unedited version of that log.

The National Weather Service reported that the morning's low temperature was 67 degrees, and at 12:53 p.m. it was 90 degrees. The wind angled out of the south at 6 to 22 mph. The sky was fair. The barometric pressure was 30.09 at 12:53 a.m., 30.10 at 5:53 a.m., 30.12 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.11 at 12:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be several inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 84 to 86 degrees. The water exhibited a greenish-brown hue with about 3 ½ feet of visibility along the dam and about 16 inches along a shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 4:46 a.m. to 6:46 a.m., 5:09 p.m. to 7:09 p.m., and 10:57 a.m. to 12:57 p.m.

We made our first casts at 10:25 a.m. and our last ones at 12: 25 p.m.

During the first hour of this two-hour outing, we caught 21 largemouth bass along the dam. Its shoreline has about a 60-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally entwined with patches of coontail. A few piles of brush also enhance the underwater terrain. Portions of the water's edge are lined with patches of American water willows. A concrete outlet tower is situated near the west end of the dam. Wads of filamentous algae adhere to some of the American water willows, patches of coontail, the outlet tower, and piles of brush. One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw TRD BugZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and it was caught on the initial drop of this rig in about four feet of water. The other largemouth bass were caught on either a Z-Man's Junebug TRD BugZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead or a 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's Junebug FattyZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. One was caught on a deadstick presentation in about 10 feet of water. The others were caught on either the initial drop of these two rigs in about three to four feet of water around patches of American water willows or a drag-and-shake presentation in five to 12 feet of water. And they were caught from as close as two feet from the water's edge to as far as about 20 feet from the water's edge.

The initial drop of the Junebug TRD BugZ rig caught one largemouth bass adjacent to a dock that is along a main-lake shoreline that is contiguous to the dam.

In the middle section of the reservoir, we caught seven largemouth bass around a main-lake point and along portions of two main-lake shorelines adjacent to the point. This area is about 125 yards long. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and some humongous boulders. Segments of this terrain are graced with some patches of coontail. It possesses a 20- to 45-degree slope. The water's edge is littered with 10 docks, a few overhanging trees, and some patches of American water willows. One largemouth bass was caught on the Junebug FattyZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught on the Junebug TRD BugZ rig with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to 10 feet of water. Three largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's mood-ring FattyZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; one was caught on a swimming presentation along the front section of one of the docks; the other two were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in six to eight feet of water.

We caught eight largemouth bass along about a 250-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of this terrain is endowed with patches of coontail. It has a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is comprised of several patches of American water willows, some overhanging trees, five docks, two concrete retaining walls, a stone bridge, some minor piles of brush, and a few laydowns. One largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop of the TRD BugZ rig adjacent to one of the concrete retaining walls in about four feet of water. Two were caught on the Junebug FattyZ rig; one was caught on the initial drop under an overhanging tree in about four feet of water, and the second one was caught on a drag-shake presentation in about seven feet of water. The mood-ring FattyZ rig caught five largemouth bass; two were caught on the initial drop in about four feet of water, and the other three were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water.

At the top is the 2 1/2-inch Junebug FattyZ rig, The 2 1/2-inch mood-ring FattyZ rig is in the middle. The Junebug TRD BugZ rig is at the top of this photograph. They are affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead.

We were hoping to catch and release at least 40 largemouth bass, which would have been an average of 20 per hour. But we ended this two-hour outing with an average of 18.5 per hour. And we accidentally caught one bluegill, one warmouth, and eight green sunfish. We didn't want to overly stress the 37 largemouth bass; therefore, we opted not to photograph any of them. What's more, we don't like to spend even a few minutes during these short old-codger outings taking a photograph rather than making several casts and possibly caching another largemouth bass.

June 20

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 20 outing with Bill Kenney of Denton.

Here is an edited version of his log.

From 6:35 a.m. to 11:35 a.m., we fished at one of several U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoirs in north-central Texas. It is the same reservoir that Norman Brown of Lewisville and I fished on June 9. During that toilsome June 9 outing, we had to make every effort to catch 10 largemouth bass and six spotted bass in 4 1/2 hours.

During our June 20 excursion, the sun was ablaze in the clear and powder-blue sky. The morning's low temperature was 78 degrees, and the afternoon's high reached 102 degrees. The barometric pressure was 30.04 at 7:00 a.m. and 30.05 at noon. The wind quartered out of the east-by-southeast at 3 to 11 mph.

In-Fisherman's solunar calander noted that the best fishing would occur from 4:54 a.m. to 6:54 a.m., 5:17 a.m. to 7:17 a.m., and 11:06 p.m. to 1:06 a.m. It also noted that the fishing would be poor.

The Corps has been releasing water from this reservoir during the past few days, and the water level has dropped two feet since June 9. Now, it is at its normal summer pool. The water displayed 12 inches of clarity in the reservoir's southwest tributary arm and 24 inches of visibility at the dam. The surface temperature ranged from 85 to 87 degrees.

We probed a mishmash of areas in the lower portion of the reservoir that included main-lake points, shorelines, flats, a portion of an island, and a segment of a dam.

These areas are endowed with submerged terrains that consist of silt, red clay, pea gravel, chunk rocks, large boulders, and riprap. Some of these black-bass haunts are steep with 30- to 60-degree gradients, and others are flat. Some of them are also adorned with partially-flooded terrestrial vegetation, laydowns, and stickups.

We hooked and lost one largemouth bass in two feet of water at a flat and rocky main-lake point at the mouth of one feeder-creek arm. Then, we caught three spotted bass and two largemouth bass in three to five feet of water from a similar main-lake point that lies a short distance from the first one we fished. We were unable to elicit any other strikes from two other rock- and boulder-laden main-lake points.

We caught 10 spotted bass and three largemouth bass from the south and west sides of a main-lake island. The island's shallow-water areas are flat with mostly a clay-and-gravel terrain. One largemouth bass and one white bass were caught from around a submerged building foundation in three feet of water on the south end of the island. The 10 spotted bass and two largemouth bass were extracted from less than five feet of water and within 10 feet of the water's edge along the west side of the island.

Three largemouth bass and one white bass were caught in five to eight feet of water from a steeply-sloped and rocky main-lake shoreline. This shoreline is about 100-yards long. There are numerous large boulders that line the shoreline near the water's edge. These largemouth bass were relating to the sides of the submerged boulders.

One spotted bass was caught from a flat shoreline just inside the mouth of a minor feeder-creek arm. Its underwater terrain consists of clay and gravel. This spotted bass was extracted from five feet of water and about 15 feet from the water's edge.

We finished the outing along the dam, which is covered with riprap. We probed about three-hundred yards of the submerged riprap that lies on the east end of the dam and caught two channel catfish that were dwelling in three to 12 feet of water. As we fished our way down the dam, we stopped and fished around a large concrete water-outlet tower.

The tower is surrounded by 30 to 50 feet of water. There was shade covering the west side of the tower, and the shade line extended about 25 feet out from the wall. The south- and north-side walls were partially shaded, and the shade lines protruded about five to 10 feet out from them. We dissected the shady areas around the tower's walls for the last 45 minutes of this outing, and we caught 19 largemouth bass. These largemouth bass were suspended as shallow as two feet and as deep as 12 feet below the surface of the water.

In closing, the black-bass fishing at this reservoir was the most bountiful that we have experienced in quite some time. During this five-hour jaunt, we caught 41 black bass: 27 were largemouth bass and 14 were spotted bass. We also caught two channel catfish and two white bass by accident.

We wielded an array of Midwest finesse baits, and seven of them were effective. The two most effective ones were a Z-Man's shiner-hue Finesse ShadZ matched with either a green-pumpkin or blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig, and a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's The Deal Slim SwimZ rigged on a black 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig.

The shiner-hue Finesse ShadZ rig was utilized with either a swim-glide-and-shake presentation or a pause-and-twitch action.

The 2 1/2-inch The Deal Slim SwimZ rig was employed with a steady-swimming retrieve.

June 23

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 23 outing with Darrell Miller of Denton.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Darrell Miller joined me for a 5 1/2-hour excursion at a rural state reservoir in north-central Texas.

Darrell has not fished for black bass in over 20 years, and this was his first introduction to Midwest finesse tactics with Z-Man's ElazTech baits and finesse jigs. He used to be an avid fly fisherman with a passion for drifting dry flies downstream to catch brook trout that inhabit many of the small streams in northern Colorado.

June 23 was bright and sunny. The sky was cloudless. The morning's low temperature was 84 degrees, and the afternoon's high temperature was 102 degrees. The wind was calm for most of the morning, but around 11:00 a.m., it began to stir slightly at about 3 mph. The barometric pressure measured 29.99 at 7:00 a.m., and 29.95 at noon.

The water exhibited three feet of clarity. The surface temperature ranged from 86 to 89 degrees. The water level was 3.04 feet below normal pool.

According to In-fisherman's solunar calendar, the best fishing periods would occur from 12:53 a.m. to 2:53 a.m., 7:04 a.m. to 9:04 a.m., and 7:25 p.m. to 9:25 p.m.

We fished from 6:30 a.m. to noon.

Our outing focused on 11 black-bass lairs: three main-lake islands, three main-lake shorelines, three main-lake points, and two riprap jetties. The three main-lake shorelines, three main-lake points, and the two riprap jetties are situated along the lower and midsection of the reservoir's east shoreline.

The three main-lake islands have not been as productive this year as they were in 2021. One is situated in the southeast region of the reservoir, the second one is located in the reservoir's middle section, and the third one is situated in the reservoir's northwest region. Their shorelines are mostly flat. The underwater terrains are composed of clay, small gravel, chunk rocks, and large boulders. There are some thin patches of flooded timber, stickups, bushes, and a few submerged stumps that adorn the shallow-water areas near the water's edge. They are surrounded by 20-plus feet of water.

The first island yielded one largemouth bass, the second island yielded one smallmouth bass, and the third one yielded two subtle strikes, which we failed to hook. These two black bass were caught next to small clusters of submerged chunk rocks and boulders in three to five feet of water.

The three main-lake shorelines were more productive than the islands. They are steep and rocky, exhibiting 35- to 60-degree slopes. There are also five boat houses on one of the shorelines. These three main-lake shorelines relinquished a total of 17 spotted bass, four largemouth bass, two green sunfish, and one freshwater drum. Twenty of these 21 black bass were extracted from the sides of large submerged boulders that lie in three to seven feet of water and within 10 feet of the water's edges. One largemouth bass was caught about eight feet below the surface from a shaded area next to a boat dock that is positioned in 23 feet of water.

The three main-lake points were not very productive. They are flat and endowed with numerous submerged rocks and boulders. One point relinquished two spotted bass, one largemouth bass, and one white bass. The other two points were fruitless. These three black bass and the one white bass were extracted from three to 10 feet of water around batches of large submerged boulders mixed with chunk rocks and gravel. We also observed a couple of small schools of white bass in 25 to 32 feet of water and foraging on small threadfin shad about 50 yards out from one of the points. We attempted to catch a few of them, but they were on the surface for only a few seconds before they disappeared.

We finished this outing by slowly dissecting two riprap-laden jetties that are located on the east side of the impoundment. A small creek channel courses between them. The portion of the channel that we fished is covered with 22 to 26 feet of water. We detected large aggregation of threadfin shad gathered in the bottom of the ditch with our sonar units. These two jetties yielded seven spotted bass, two smallmouth bass, and two largemouth bass. They were caught in six to 12 feet of water and three to 15 feet from the water's edge. Three were caught near the deep-water end of the first jetty, and the other eight were caught around a 10-yard section of submerged riprap on the second jetty. We failed to garner any strikes on the bottom of the creek channel where we located the threadfin shad.

In total, we caught 41 fish. Thirty-seven of them were black bass, which consisted of twenty-six spotted bass, eight largemouth bass, and three smallmouth bass. We also inadvertently caught two green sunfish, one white bass, and one freshwater drum.

These 37 black bass were caught on three Z-Man Midwest-finesse rigs: one was tempted by a steady-swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. A steady-swimming retrieve with a Z-Man's hot-snakes Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig enticed eight black bass. A Z-Man's hot-snakes TRD TicklerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig and utilized with a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation allured 28 black bass.

In closing, most of the locales that we fished were shaded, and they were much more lucrative than the sun-drenched ones.

June 24

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 24 outing with Norman Brown of Lewisville, Texas.

Here is an edited version of his log.

On June 16, Rick Allen of Dallas and I fished at a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' reservoir in north-central Texas in hopes of catching some smallmouth bass. We fished for four hours, and to our delight, we tangled with 17 smallmouth bass and 15 largemouth bass.

On June 24, Norman Brown and I thought we would give the smallmouth bass fishing at this reservoir another try. But much to our dismay, it was not as good as it had been.

The sun was intense, and the sky was clear on June 24. It was also humid. The morning's low temperature was 86 degrees. The afternoon's high temperature was a stifling 104 degrees. The wind quartered out of the south-by-southwest at 10 to 15 mph, and it seemed to provide a tad of relief from the heat. The barometric pressure measured 29.88 at 7:00 a.m. and 29.87 at 11:00 a.m.

We fished from 6:55 a.m. to 11:25 a.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the fishing would be poor. The most productive fishing periods would occur from 1:28 a.m. to 3:28 a.m., 7:39 a.m. to 9:39 a.m., and 8:01 p.m. to 10:01 p.m.

The water exhibited about 18 inches of visibility. The surface temperature ranged from 86 degrees at the dam to 89 degrees at a main-lake point in the northwest region of the reservoir. The water level has been high since June 3 from the aftereffects of several severe thunderstorms, but it has now receded to its normal summertime level.

We launched the boat at about 6:45 a.m., and we traveled about 1 1/2 miles to a main-lake island that is located at the southeast end of the reservoir.

Just as we arrived at the west end of the island, a large school of small eight-inch white bass suddenly appeared near us and began to forage on small threadfin shad on the water's surface. We made a few casts around the edges and through the center of the school and caught two of them on a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig that was employed with a moderately fast-paced swimming retrieve just below the surface of the water. When we discovered how small they were, we decided to move on to the island and begin our search for largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass.

Around the island, we caught 10 largemouth bass. This island's submerged terrain is flat. It is comprised of red clay, small gravel, chunk rocks, and a few boulders. The shallow-water areas are cluttered with laydowns, some standing timber, clusters of buck brush, and stumps.

Nine of the 10 largemouth bass were caught from a flat and rocky point on the west end of the island in less than five feet of water. Six of them were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with the pearl Baby Goat rig. The seventh largemouth bass was caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with a shortened Z-Man's Canada-craw Hula StickZ rigged on a 1/16-ounce green-pumpkin-red-flake mushroom-type jig. The eight largemouth bass was tempted by a steady-swimming retrieve with a shortened Z-Man's black-blue Hula StickZ fastened on a 1/16-ounce green-pumpkin-red-flake mushroom-type jig. The ninth largemouth bass was enticed by a steady-swimming retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pumpkin-chartreuse ZinkerZ affixed on a 1/16-ounce chartreuse mushroom-type jig. The tenth largemouth bass was caught from an opening between two bushes in three feet of water. It was caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with the pearl Baby Goat rig. We failed to locate any black bass around the standing timber, stumps, and laydowns on the north and south sides of the island.

From the island, we moved to the east end of the reservoir where we dissected the submerged riprap along the dam. The submerged riprap along this dam had attracted a decent number of smallmouth bass during the past three weeks. For example, Rick Allen and I caught 17 of them on June 3, and another 17 on June 16. This riprap-laden dam forms the eastern boundary of this impoundment. Its most obvious feature is a large concrete water-outlet tower that is positioned near the middle section of the dam.

During this June 24 outing, the smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, and spotted bass were much more difficult to locate along the dam, and we struggled to catch three smallmouth bass and three largemouth bass. They were scattered along the dam, and none of them were grouped together. We were also surprised that we did not cross paths with any spotted bass at this location. In fact, we did not catch a spotted bass during this entire outing, which is very unusual for us at this reservoir.

These six black bass were abiding in three to 10 feet of water and within 10 to 20 feet of the water's edge, and it took several Midwest finesse rigs to allure them. Two were caught on the shortened black-blue Hula StickZ combo; one was caught on a Z-Man's shiner Finesse ShadZ matched with a 1/15-ounce Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse ShroomZ jig; another one was tempted by the shortened Canada-craw Hula StickZ rig; a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ fastened to a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig allured one; the sixth bass was allured by a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig dressed with a Z-Man's The Deal TRD TicklerZ. Four of these six black bass were attracted to a swimming retrieve, and two were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation.

When we finished fishing the dam, we decided to move to the northwest region of the reservoir. We examined nine main-lake points and a 100-yard stretch of a rocky main-lake shoreline. In years past, these main-lake points and shoreline were some of our most dependable and productive back-bass lairs at this reservoir, but so far this year, they have not panned out.

We did not make a single cast at seven of the nine main-lake points because they were not entertaining any significant numbers of threadfin shad.

The two points that we did fish had decent numbers of threadfin shad around them, but our results were disappointing. The side of one point yielded one dinky largemouth bass that was caught near a batch of submerged boulders and chuck rocks in four feet of water. It engulfed The Deal TRD TicklerZ rig as it was swimming, gliding, and shaking next to one of the submerged boulders. The other main-lake point was not much better. It relinquished two largemouth bass and one white bass. They were caught in six to 12 feet of water. One largemouth bass and one white bass were caught on the black-blue Hula StickZ combo that was employed with a swimming retrieve. The other largemouth bass preferred The Deal TRD TicklerZ rig and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

The 100-yard section of rocky main-lake shoreline left us disgruntled as well. This shoreline has slopes that range from 30 to 60 degrees. It is adorned with scores of submerged boulders mixed with chunk rocks. We located several large aggregations of threadfin shad along this shoreline, but we failed to catch a smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, or spotted bass around the rocks, boulders, and schools of shad.

Overall, the black-bass fishing at this Corps' reservoir was not as good as it has been in recent weeks. In our eyes, our results were average by north-central Texas' standards. We caught a total of 16 largemouth bass, three smallmouth bass, and three white bass in 5 1/2 hours.

We have no clue as to where the smallmouth bass that were relating to the riprap on the dam have gone, but we hope to cross paths with them again in the days, weeks, and months to come.

June 24

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 24 outing with his cousin Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, at one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs.

Here is an unedited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that the morning's low temperature was 71 degrees, and it was 90 degrees at 5:53 p.m. The wind angled out of the southeast, south, northeast, and east at 5 to 26 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair to partly cloudy to mostly cloudy to overcast to fair again, and it rained lightly around 9:53 a.m. The barometric pressure was 29.94 at 12:53 a.m., 29.96 at 5:53 a.m., 29.94 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.88 at 4:53 p.m.

The water level looked to be several inches above its normal level. The surface temperature ranged from 81 to 82 degrees. The water exhibited a greenish-brown hue with about 3 ½ feet of visibility along the dam and about three feet along a shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir. Significant blankets of duckweeds are beginning to cover the surface along some of the shorelines in the upper half of this reservoir.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., 7:25 p.m. to 9:25 p.m., and 1:19 a.m. to 3:19 a.m.

We made our first casts at 12:45 a.m. and our last ones at 3:55 p.m.

We fished along the shoreline of the dam twice and caught 12 largemouth bass. Its shoreline has about a 60-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are occasionally entwined with patches of coontail. A few piles of brush also enhance the underwater terrain. Portions of the water's edge are lined with patches of American water willows. A concrete outlet tower is situated near the west end of the dam. Wads of filamentous algae adhere to some of the American water willows, patches of coontail, the outlet tower, and piles of brush. The first largemouth bass of the outing was caught on a Z-Man's Junebug TRD BugZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead, and it was caught on the initial drop of this rig in about four feet of water. The other largemouth bass were caught on either a 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's Junebug FattyZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead or a 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's Junebug FattyZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Our FattyZ rigs caught two of the largemouth bass on a deadstick presentation. Three were caught on the initial drop. Another three were caught on a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation. Seven were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation. These largemouth bass were caught in four to 10 feet of water. Some were caught near the water's edge, a few were caught as far as 18 to 20 feet from the water's edge, and the others were caught between the water's edge and 20 from the water's edge.

Adjacent to a dock that is along one of the main-lake shorelines that are contiguous to the dam, we caught one largemouth bass on the FattyZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in about eight feet of water and around a patch of coontail. And along the shoreline that is attached to the other end of the dam, we caught three largemouth bass with our 2 ½-inch FattyZ rigs with swimming presentations around patches of coontail and wads of filamentous algae.

We caught one largemouth bass along an offshore ledge that is situated in the lower quarter of the reservoir. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some of the boulders are gigantic. Portions of this terrain are entwined with meager patches of coontail. The FattyZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation while strolling caught this largemouth bass in about six feet of water.

In the middle section of the reservoir, we caught 15 largemouth bass around three main-lake points and along the main-lake shorelines that are contiguous to the three points. This area is about 375 yards long. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and some humongous boulders. These boulders create some ledges. There are some small patches of coontail gracing parts of the underwater terrain. The points and shoreline possess a 20- to 50-degree slope. The water's edge is lined with scores of docks, some riprap, a few patches of American water willows, some retaining walls, and three overhanging trees. All of these largemouth bass were caught on our FattyZ rigs. Some were caught on the initial drop near the water's edge and adjacent to the patches of American water willows in three to four feet of water. A few were caught adjacent to the docks with a drag-and-shake presentation in six to nine feet of water. One was caught while strolling parallel to a large patch of American water willows with a slow swimming presentation in about five feet of water. The others were caught with a drag-and-shake presentation around the rocks and boulders in six to 11 feet of water.

We caught 15 largemouth bass on our FattyZ rigs along about a 400-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. Some sections of this terrain are endowed with patches of coontail. This massive stretch of water has a 20- to 60-degree slope. The water's edge is adorned with several patches of American water willows, some overhanging trees, 10 docks, several concrete retaining walls, a stone bridge, occasional piles of brush, several minor blankets of duckweed, and a few laydowns. Seven largemouth bass were caught on the initial drop of our rigs in four to five feet of water. Five were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in five to 10 feet of water. Across a shallow-water patch of coontail, we caught three largemouth bass with a swimming presentation in about four feet of water. Six were caught in the vicinity of overhanging trees. Four were caught adjacent to patches of American water willows. Two were caught in the vicinity of one of the docks.

The wind became a problem when we attempted to fish along about a 300-yard stretch of another main-lake shoreline in the upper half of this reservoir. And it was a frustrating effort to catch two largemouth bass on our FattyZ rigs. This shoreline has a 30- to 50-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are laced with some coontail patches. The water's edge is lined with 12 docks, several concrete and rock retaining walls, several patches of American water willows, some overhanging trees, one large laydown, and some piles of brush. The initial drop inveigled one largemouth bass at a corner of one of the concrete retaining walls in about three feet of water. The second largemouth bass was caught on the initial drop around a large patch of coontail in about four feet of water.

In the middle section of the reservoir, we attempted to fish another wind-blown shoreline. The section we fished is about 100-yards long. It possesses a 30- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, and some areas are endowed with a few patches of coontail. An offshore ledge that plummets into deep water parallels a portion of this shoreline. The water's edge is lined with a few patches of American water willows, one overhanging tree, and nine docks. We caught two largemouth bass with our FattyZ rigs with a drag-and-shake presentation in seven to 10 feet of water in the vicinity of the offshore ledge.

In conclusion, our 2 1/2-inch FattyZ rigs tangled with 52 largemouth bass. The TRD BugZ tangled with one. Along one of the main-lake shorelines in the middle section of the reservoir and along one of the shorelines in the upper half of this reservoir, our FattyZ rigs elicited an uncountable number of strikes from what we suspected were bluegill, green sunfish, and warmouth. Some of them, of course, might have been largemouth bass and channel catfish. Along these two shorelines, we estimate that we elicited more than 150 strikes that we failed to hook. On some retrieves, we would elicit two to three strikes. We failed to keep an exact record of other species we caught, but our inaccurate records note that we caught one crappie, five bluegill, eight warmouth, and 13 green sunfish.

At the top of this photo is the standard 4 7/8-inch FattyZ. The middle one is the 2 ½-inch customized rendition affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. The bottom one is the 2 ½-inch customized rendition affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

We began using the 2 ½-inch customized FattyZ in 2012. At that time, we were hoping that Z-Man would manufacture a three-inch version that was free of salt and devoid of the molded-in hook slot, but that has never happened. We recently began using the 2 ½-inch customized again, and once again it has entertained us by eliciting an incredible number of strikes from a variety of species.

June 25

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, filed a brief on the Finesse News Network about his short outing with his grandson Brady Cayton of Lawrence at one of northeastern Kansas' many community reservoirs.

Here is an unedited version of his brief.

The National Weather Service reported that the morning's low temperature was 78 degrees, and the afternoon's high temperature was 95 degrees. The wind angled out of the southeast, south, southwest, west, northwest, and north at 3 to 25 mph. The sky fluctuated from being fair to being partly cloudy to being cluttered with a few clouds to being overcast to being fair again, and it rained lightly from 6:52 a.m. to 7:52 a.m. The barometric pressure was 29.81 at 12:52 a.m., 29.86 at 5:52 a.m., 29.90 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.93 at 3:52 p.m.

The water level looked to be normal. The surface temperature was 85 degrees. The water exhibited about four feet of visibility in the vicinity of the dam.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would take place from 8:11 a.m. to 10:11 a.m., 8:34 p.m. to 10:34 p.m., and 2:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.

Our grandson Brady had heard about the renaissance that we had been recently enjoying with the 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's Junebug FattyZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. During its original heydays, beginning in the summer of 2012, he didn't get to fish with it. So, he asked if we could spend an hour or two wielding it on June 25 and counting how many strikes this rig would elicit. And we did.

We made our first casts at 1:30 p.m. and our last ones at 3:00 p.m. And we spent those 90 minutes dissecting the shoreline of the dam, the dam's spillway, and short sections of two shorelines adjacent to the dam.

On his first cast, he elicited three strikes, and he failed to hook a fish. On his second cast, he elicited two strikes and caught a green sunfish. After that, we calculated that we elicited 108 strikes and caught 21 green sunfish, 14 largemouth bass, two channel catfish, and one bluegill.

The underwater terrains of these locales consist of gravel, rocks, and boulders. A few stumps, several man-made piles of brush, and tads of Eurasian milfoil adorn some of these terrains.

The dam has about a 65- to 70-degree slope. It is about 250-yards long. Its water's edge is endowed with many patches of American water willows that are growing in six inches to almost 2 ½ feet of water, a few partially submerged logs, and several piles of brush.

The spillway has a 20-degree slope. Its water's edge is lined with patches of American water willows and one patch of cattails.

We fished about 125 yards of each shoreline. They have a 25- to 45-degree slope. One is completely lined with patches of American water willows, adorned with one large overhanging tree, enriched with several large piles of boulders, and bedecked with six stumps. The other shoreline is lined with seven patches of American water willows. Both of them are endowed with an offshore hump that consists of rocks, boulders, and stumps.

Some of the 108 strikes occurred on the initial drop of our FattyZ rigs in about two to three feet of water. And some of the 38 fish were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. The other strikes and hooked fish happened while we were employing either a drag-and-shake presentation or a deadstick presentation in four to 12 feet of water.

On Brady's last cast, he caught a tiny green sunfish on the initial drop of his FattyZ rig along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in about three feet of water, and upon hooking that green sunfish, a whopper-size largemouth bass engulf the green sunfish, but within a few seconds, the largemouth bass jumped several feet into the air and regurgitated the green sunfish.

Immediately after that simultaneous undertaking with a green sunfish and largemouth bass, Brady began to remove a loop from the spool of his spinning reel, and during this process, his FattyZ rig was suspended in about 15 feet of water and vertically below the boat. And to our surprise, the FattyZ rig was engulfed by some hefty species that immediately broke Brady's eight-pound-test fluorocarbon leader.

Brady concluded the outing by saying that it was the most engrossing and enjoyable 90 minutes that he had ever spent fishing.

June 27 and 28

Ned Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log about his June 27 and 28 outings.

Here is an edited version of them.

I am nearly lost for words to describe what has transpired since June 24 when Rick Hebenstreit of Shawnee, Kansas, and I fished for three hours and 10 minutes and caught 52 largemouth bass, 13 green sunfish, eight warmouth, five bluegill, and one crappie, and when Brady Cayton of Lawrence, Kansas, and I fished for 90 minutes on June 25 and caught 21 green sunfish, 14 largemouth bass, two channel catfish, and one bluegill. What's more, the fish were so active that Rick and I estimated that we elicited more than 150 strikes that we failed to hook. And Brady and I actually counted that we elicited 108 strikes, and we failed to hook 70 of them. We suspect that the bulk of those strikes were rendered by bluegill, green sunfish, warmouth, and perhaps a channel catfish or two.

On June 26, a significant cold front arrived. The morning's low temperature was 78 degrees, and the afternoon's high temperature was 95 degrees on June 25. The normal low temperature for June 25, 26, 27, and 28 is 66 degrees, and the normal high temperature is 89. On June 26, the low temperature was 59 degrees, and the high temperature was 80. On June 27, the low was 55 degrees, and the high was 83. And on June 28, the low was 56 degrees, and the high was 86 degrees.

The arrival of the cold front corresponded with a horrible change in the water clarity. There was also a significant wilting and disappearance of many patches of submerged aquatic vegetation.

The changes in the water clarity, aquatic vegetation, and weather paralleled significant changes in our abilities to elicit vast numbers of strikes and catch significant numbers of black bass and other species.

Here is what transpired.

Pat Kehde and I fished on June 27 at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs on June 27 from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

According to the National Weather Service, it was 56 degrees at 5:52 a.m. and 81 degrees at 3:52 p.m. The sky was fair. The wind was calm at times, and when it stirred it angled out of the southeast, northwest, north, and northeast at 3 to 10 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.31 at 12:52 a.m., 30.32 at 5:52 a.m., 30.35 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.29 at 3:52 p.m.

The water exhibited a strange tea-like hue with 2 1/2 to four feet of visibility. The water level looked to be more than two feet above normal. The surface temperature was 83 degrees.

This reservoir's gigantic patches of curly-leaf pondweeds had disappeared. And its vast patches of bushy pondweeds were wilting. This is a normal phenomenon in June, and it usually stains the water clarity.

During this two-hour outing, we were hoping to elicit scores of strikes from a variety of species and catch more than 20 largemouth bass, which is usually an easy chore. For instance, we caught 60 largemouth bass in two hours at this reservoir on May 6.

We thought that the bulk of the strikes would occur along the outside edges of this reservoir's stupendous patches of American water willows, which adorn almost every inch of its shorelines.

But to our dismay, we elicited only 15 strikes and caught four bluegills and six largemouth bass.

Three of the largemouth bass were caught on a massive shallow-water flat around patches of submerged coontail in the back of one of the reservoir's primary feeder-creek arms. Two were caught on a Z-Man's Canada-craw Finesse TRD affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a slow swimming presentation in about six feet of water. The third largemouth bass was caught on a 2 ½-inch customized Z-Man's Junebug FattyZ affixed to a baby-blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water.

The other three largemouth bass were caught inside another primary feeder-creek arm.

One was caught around a secondary point along the outside edge of the American water willows. It was caught on the initial drop of the FattyZ rig in about four feet of water.

The other two were caught along the outside edges of the American water willow patches that embellish one of the shorelines inside this feeder-creek arm. One was caught on a deadstick presentation with the Finesse TRD rig in about five feet of water. The other one was caught on the initial drop of the Finesse TRD rig in about three feet of water.

On June 28, Rick Hebenstreit and I fished at one of northeastern Kansas' many community reservoirs. This reservoir yielded five smallmouth bass and 70 largemouth bass in two hours and 45 minutes on May 23, and 13 smallmouth bass and 48 largemouth bass in about four hours on June 9.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 59 degrees at 5:53 a.m. and 82 degrees at 1:53 p.m. Between 5:53 a.m. and 8:53 a.m., the conditions of the sky varied from being overcast to mostly cloudy to partly cloudy to being cluttered with a few clouds, and then it varied from being fair to being cluttered with a few clouds. The wind angled out of the northeast, southeast, south, southwest, and west at 5 to18 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.26 at 12:53 a.m., 30.25 at 5:53 a.m., 30.25 at 11:53 a.m., and 30.19 at 2:53 p.m.

At one locale near the upper end of this reservoir's main feeder-creek arm, the water almost exhibited the hue of chocolate milk with a few inches of visibility. The water in the vicinity of the dam exhibited about 2 ½ feet of visibility. Many of this reservoir's splendid patches of coontail have disappeared. The water level was slightly above normal. The surface temperature ranged from 82 to 83 degrees.

We fished along about a mile of a main-lake shoreline situated in the middle section of this reservoir, two main-lake points in the reservoir's lower section, one main-lake point in the middle section, two short main-lake shorelines adjacent to the dam, two shallow-water flats inside two minor feeder-creek arms, and about a 125-yard section of the shoreline along the dam. Along these areas, we elicited five meager strikes and failed to catch a fish.

We did catch four largemouth bass and one smallmouth bass around a main-lake point and along about a 250-yard section of a main-lake shoreline in the upper half of the reservoir. This shoreline has a 30- to 60-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are entwined with a few meager patches of coontail and bits of bushy pondweeds. The water's edge is embellished with laydowns, overhanging trees, overhanging terrestrial vegetation, and a few patches of American water willows. The smallmouth bass was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation with our Junebug FattyZ rig in about six feet of water, and on the next cast and a drag-and-shake presentation, the Junebug FattyZ rig inveigled a largemouth bass in about six feet of water; these fish were caught adjacent to a minor laydown and near an overhanging tree. Around a tertiary point that is adorned with a patch of American water willows, our FattyZ rig caught two largemouth bass; one was caught on a deadstick presentation in about seven feet of water, and the other one was caught on a drag-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water. Along the outside edge of a large patch of American water willows that graces the main-lake point, the initial drop of the Junebug FattyS rig hooked a largemouth bass in about 3 ½ feet of water.

Around a main-lake point in the reservoir's middle section, we caught two largemouth bass. This point is surrounded by 25 to 35 feet of water. Before it plunges into the deep water, it has a 25- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are garnished with some patches of coontail. Its water's edge is festooned with a large patch of American water willows and several laydowns. The two largemouth bass were caught on back-to-back casts with the Junebug FattyZ rig around a patch of coontail with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about seven feet of water.

Along about a 30-yard section of a shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm in the reservoir's lower section, we caught nine largemouth bass in about 20 minutes. This shoreline has about a 25- to 30-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders, which are graced with a significant patch of coontail and some man-made piles of brush. The water's edge is bedizened by a massive patch of American water willows. These largemouth bass were caught on our Junebug FattyZ rigs. Two were caught on the initial drop, and the others were caught on the swim-slide-and-glide presentation. These largemouth bass were residing in six to nine feet of water.

We caught one largemouth bass along about a 100-yard section of a main-lake shoreline in the lower section of the reservoir. It has a 30- to 45-degree slope. The underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and boulders. The water's edge is laced with extensive patches of American water willows. This largemouth bass engulfed the Junebug FattyZ rig on the initial drop along the outside edge of a patch of American water willows in about three feet of water.

Inside a small feeder-creek arm in the middle section of the reservoir, we caught seven largemouth bass. Six of them were caught on top of patches of coontail that gild one of this feeder-creek's shallow-water and flat shorelines. Two largemouth bass were caught on a 2 ½-inch Z-Man's pearl ZinkerZ affixed to a chartreuse 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in five to six feet of water. Two largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD MinnowZ rig affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig; one was caught on the initial drop in about six feet of water; the other one was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. Two were caught on our Junebug FattyZ rigs with a swim-glide-and-shake presentation in about six feet of water. The seventh one was caught on the initial drop of the Junebug FattyZ rig near the water's edge, next to a minor laydown, and a small patch of American water willows in about 2 ½ feet of water.

For two days, we tried to make some piscatorial sense about these two sorry outings. For decades, it has been fashionable for anglers to blame cold fronts for sorry catches. But in all of our years of wielding Midwest finesse tactics in northeastern Kansas, we could not remember such a radical change that we witnessed and endured on June 27 and 28. And the radical change in the water clarity at the community reservoir was quite disconcerting and worrisome.

June 30

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his June 30 outing with Bill Kenney of Denton.

Here is an edited version of his log.

From 7:01 a.m. to 12:01 p.m., we conducted a morning junk-fishing excursion at a challenging U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the prime fishing periods would occur from 6:03 a.m. to 8:03 a.m., 11:50 a.m. to 1:50 p.m., and 12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. The calendar also noted that the fishing would be average.

The sun was intensely bright, and it was hot. The morning's low temperature was 78 degrees. The afternoon's high temperature climbed to 102 degrees. The wind was virtually nonexistent for most of the morning, but around 11:00 a.m., we felt a slight breeze angling out of the northeast at less than 5 mph. The barometric pressure measured 30.04 at 7:00 a.m., and it dropped slightly to 29.99 by noon.

The water level was normal. The water displayed 2 1/2 feet of clarity. The water temperature ranged from 84 degrees in the southeast end of the reservoir to 87 degrees inside a feeder-creek arm in the middle section of the reservoir's east tributary arm.

The bulk of this reservoir's underwater terrain consists of red clay, small gravel, chunk rocks, and large boulders. The upper half of this reservoir is a paradise for power anglers. Here, they can explore acres and acres of thick stands of flooded timber, laydowns, stumps, brush piles, and buck brush to their hearts' content. We have also ventured into the thick and hazardous timbered areas on occasion, and it is a difficult and prolonged endeavor to maneuver a boat through it. Therefore, we choose to spend the vast majority of our outings in the less-hazardous middle and lower regions of the reservoir.

Here is how our five-hour jaunt unfolded.

We caught two spotted bass inside a major feeder-creek arm in the southeast end of the reservoir. Both of them were caught in three to five feet of water from a large shaded portion of the west shoreline of an island that is located in the lower section of the creek arm. They were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve about a foot or two below the surface of the water with a Z-Man's pearl Baby Goat rigged on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig.

In three to seven feet of water along a flat 40-yard segment of a pea-gravel and chunk-rock main-lake shoreline, we caught two spotted bass, one largemouth bass, and one spotted bass-hybrid. This shoreline is situated in the lower end of the east tributary arm and about a mile north of the southeast feeder-creek arm. The two spotted bass were caught on a steady-swimming retrieve with an 1/8-ounce pearl-and-blue Z-Man's Finesse EyeZ Jighead matched with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's The Deal Slim SwimZ. The largemouth bass was induced by a Z-Man's shiner-hue Finesse ShadZ rigged on an 1/8-ounce pearl-and-blue Z-Man's Finesse EyeZ Jighead as it was being steadily dragged across the bottom. The largemouth bass was enticed by a swimming retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed on a blue 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig.

From that shoreline, we moved a couple of miles to the southwest, where we fished along the center and west end of the dam.

The dam is covered with riprap and forms the southern perimeter of the reservoir. The center of the dam features a large concrete water-outlet tower that is surrounded by 35 to 53 feet of water. Around this tower, we extracted five largemouth bass that were suspended about five feet below the surface and within a foot or two of the shady north- and west-side walls of the tower. Two of the largemouth bass were caught on a swim-glide-and-shake presentation with a Z-Man's perfect-perch Finesse TRD rigged on a 1/15-ounce chartreuse Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. Two other largemouth bass were allured by a swimming retrieve with a 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's bad-shad Slim SwimZ rigged on an 1/8-ounce pearl-and-blue

Z-Man's Finesse EyeZ Jighead, and the fifth largemouth bass was snookered by a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with the shiner-hue Finesse ShadZ rig.

The east and south sides of the tower, which were not shaded, were fruitless.

After we finished fishing around the tower, we moved to the shoreline of the dam. We dissected the submerged riprap from the center section of the dam by the tower westward for about 400 yards, and we caught eight largemouth bass and two freshwater drum. These fish were scattered about and abiding in eight to 13 feet of water, and from three to about 60 feet from the water's edge. Five of the largemouth bass and the two freshwater drum were allured by a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with a Z-Man's hot-snakes TRD TicklerZ rigged on a chartreuse 1/15-ounce Finesse ShroomZ jig. Two more largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's coppertreuse Finesse TRD rigged on a chartreuse 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead; one of these two largemouth bass engulfed this Finesse TRD rig as it was being deadsticked on the bottom in 10 feet of water, and the other largemouth bass struck this rig on the surface of the water and about five feet from the boat as it was being quickly reeled in for another cast. The eighth largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's bubble-gut TRD TicklerZ that was fastened on a black 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead as it was being implemented with a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

From the dam, we moved a couple of miles northward where we fished around two prominent main-lake points that separate the reservoir's east and west tributary arms. According to our sonar devices, the larger and more dominant point was devoid of any threadfin shad and black bass, so we did not fish it. We did locate some small pods of threadfin shad around the second point. We fished as shallow as two feet and as deep as 27 feet around the pods of shad that were abiding near the end and sides of this point, but we failed to catch a largemouth bass, spotted bass, or hybrid-spotted bass from this point.

After that, we traveled about three miles up the east tributary arm, where we dissected a flat and rocky main-lake entry point to a major feeder-creek arm, the deep-water side of a rock ledge abutting the main-lake entry point and the sides and end of a minor rocky secondary point in the lower end of the creek arm.

We focused on one side and the end of the flat clay-and-gravel main-lake point. These two areas of the point drop radically into deep water. We caught three largemouth bass in this area, but they were not closely associated with the point. Rather, they were suspended about five feet below the surface in 27 feet of water and about 40 to 60 feet out from the side of the point. Two of them were allured by a slow swim-glide-and-shake presentation with the hot-snakes TRD TicklerZ rig. The other largemouth bass was caught on a swim-glide-and-shake retrieve with the coppertreuse Finesse TRD rig.

The deep-water side of the adjoining rock ledge and the area around the rocky secondary point in the lower end of the creek arm were devoid of black bass.

In conclusion, I have not fished at this reservoir since June 13, which was when Bear Brundrett of Valley View, Texas, and I caught a total of 19 largemouth bass, two spotted bass, and one hybrid-spotted bass in six hours. This June 30 excursion mirrored that June 13 outing, and it was a grind for us to catch 17 largemouth bass, four spotted bass, and one hybrid-spotted bass on nine different Z-Man's Midwest-finesse rigs in five hours.

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