Z-Man Fishing Products Logo
Z-Man Fishing Products Tagline
THE CHATTER
Keep up with the latest Z-Man
tips, news and happenings.
Midwest Finesse Fishing: January 2021

Compiled and edited by Ned Kehde and Steve Reideler

Brandon Marlow with a spotted bass that he caught on Jan. 30.

Jan. 2

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 2 with Adam Smith of Corryton, Tennessee, at a highland reservoir in northeastern Tennessee.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The nearest National Weather Service site reported that it was 46 degrees at 8:35 a.m. and 61 degrees at 2:35 p.m. The conditions of the sky varied from being fair to partly cloudy to mostly cloudy to overcast. The wind was calm at times, and when it stirred, it was variable at times, and it also angled out of the south, east, and southeast at 3 to 12 mph. The barometric pressure was 29.96 at 12:15 a.m., 30.04 at 5:15 a.m., 30.05 at 11:15 a.m., and 29.99 at 2:15 p.m.

The water level was 19.80 feet below full pool. The surface temperature was 49 degrees. The water exhibited eight to 10 feet of visibility.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the best times to fish occurred from 12:55 a.m. to 2:55 a.m., 1:21 p.m. to 3:21 p.m., and 7:08 a.m. to 9:08 a.m.

We fished from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and this outing was a grind to catch 16 smallmouth bass and two largemouth bass.

The morning began with no wind, and there was a bluebird sky, which is a recipe for a rough day on this highland reservoir -- especially in the winter.

Between 9:30 a.m. and noon, we managed to catch four smallmouth bass and one largemouth bass, which we caught along a couple of channel-swing shorelines. These shorelines have a 45-degree slope, and they are adorned with scattered laydowns. The underwater terrain is endowed with chunk rocks. The bass were caught on a Z-Man's Fishing Products' PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a number-two hook. We employed a deadstick presentation in 20 feet of water and deadsticked the rig for up to two minutes before moving it. The strikes were very subtle, and line watching was key to detecting the strikes. By holding the tips of our rods almost vertically and watching the line where it entered the water, we could see the slightest strike. These strikes would have been difficult if we were not using a hi-vis braided line.

The wind finally picked up just before 1:00 p.m. Then, we fished along windblown shorelines with a 45-degree slope that are adorned with scattered laydowns and an underwater terrain that consists of chunk rocks. We caught 12 smallmouth bass and one largemouth bass during our final two hours.

They were caught in five to 10 feet of water on our PB&J Finesse TRD rigs with a hop-and-bounce presentation. We hopped the rig with short snaps of the rod, reeled up the slack, paused, and repeated that routine until the rig was in water deeper than 10 feet. It isn't a technique we usually use in cold water, but it was how these black bass wanted it.

Jan. 3

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 3 with Adam Smith of Corryton, Tennessee, at a highland reservoir in northeastern Tennessee.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The nearest National Weather Service site reported that it was 39 degrees at 7:55 a.m. and 46 degrees at 1:35 p.m. The conditions of the sky varied from mostly cloudy to overcast. The wind was calm, and when it stirred, it was variable at times, and it also angled out of the northwest, southwest, and west at 5 to 16 mph. The barometric pressure was 29.91 at 12:35 a.m., 29.98 at 5:35 a.m., 30.08 at 11:35 a.m., and 30.04 at 2:35 p.m.

The water level was 20.82 feet below full pool. The surface temperature was 49 degrees. The water exhibited around 12 feet of visibility.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the best times to fish occurred from 1:53 a.m. to 3:53 a.m., 2:18 p.m. to 4:18 p.m., and 8:05 a.m. to 10:05 a.m.

We fished from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the lower end of this reservoir.

We had a good and steady wind the entire time, which helped the bite tremendously. I lost my fish counter, but we estimate that we caught more than 40 black bass.

They were caught on three Midwest finesse rigs: a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig, a Z-Man's molting-craw Finesse TRD affixed to a black 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig, and a Z-Man's green-pumpkin-orange TRD CrawZ affixed to a black 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig.

We spent the entire outing fishing along main-lake shorelines that were windblown. They possessed about a 45-degree slope. They are rock-laden and graced with scattered laydowns.

No matter what section of the reservoir that I fish during the winter, these are the kinds of shorelines that I fish – as long as they fall into depths of 30 feet or more. I will fish these locales until the water temperature reaches 55 degrees, and then I will start dissecting prespawn areas.

These shorelines can be as short as 50 yards long or as long as a mile. It is essential that they are windblown. I have always heard the wind pushes the bait to the shorelines, and that is why the black bass become active. That may be true, but I believe the wind creates a form of cover for the black bass, and they become comfortable and move around looking for food.

The first shoreline yielded 11 smallmouth bass. Nine were caught on the PB&J Finesse TRD rig, one on the molting-craw Finesse TRD rig, and one on the green-pumpkin-orange TRD CrawZ rig. We used the drag-and-pause presentation and quivered the rod tip during the pause. These smallmouth bass were caught in less than 10 feet of water, and a couple of them seemed to be in less than a foot of water, and they engulfed the rig as soon as it hit the water. Several smallmouth bass liberated themselves before we could lift them into the boat, and one looked to be a four-pounder.

Along the second windblown and rock-laden shoreline, which lies about 100 yards from the first shoreline, we caught seven smallmouth bass and one largemouth bass. They were caught in two to 10 feet of water with the drag-pause-and-quiver technique. The molting-craw Finesse TRD rig caught two smallmouth bass. The largemouth bass and five smallmouth bass were caught on the PB&J Finesse TRD rig. The largemouth bass was caught around the base of a laydown. The smallmouth bass were scattered.

The third shoreline was in the vicinity of the dam, and we fished about 500 yards of it. It yielded three smallmouth bass. The wind was blowing parallel to it rather than directly onto it. Two of the three were caught on the green-pumpkin-orange TRD CrawZ rig, and one was caught on the PB&J Finesse TRD rig. They were caught in about 15 feet of water with a deadstick presentation.

The fourth shoreline was directly across the reservoir from where we launched the boat. This is where I started losing count of the black bass that we caught. It is a long main-lake shoreline, and the wind was hitting it perfectly. We caught them up and down this whole stretch in one to 10 feet of water on the molting-craw Finesse TRD rig and PB&J Finesse TRD rig. Most were caught on the drag-and-pause retrieve, and a few were caught on the initial drop of our rigs. A lot of these black bass were around 12 inches long, and a few were decent-size ones. A few of them were spotted bass. If we could do it over again, we would have fished this shoreline more than once. We just ran out of time.

Jan. 4

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log about his Jan. 4 outing on the Finesse News Network.

Here is an edited version of his log.

I took advantage of a mild-winter day to fish from noon to 3:30 p.m. at an U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' hill-land reservoir in north-central Texas, where the wintertime black-bass fishing is traditionally horrendous.

Our part of Texas was walloped with a major cold front that was accompanied by thunderstorms on Dec. 30 and 31. Air temperatures dropped from the upper-60s to the mid- to upper-30s. But on Jan. 4, the sky conditions had improved from overcast to partly cloudy. The afternoon high temperature peaked at 65 degrees. The morning low temperature was 32 degrees. The barometric pressure measured 30.14 at noon and it fell slightly to 30.11 by 4:00 p.m. The wind quartered out of the northwest at 5 to 10 mph.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar table, the most productive fishing periods would occur from 2:40 a.m. to 4:40 a.m., 8:52 a.m. to 10:52 a.m., and 3:04 p.m. to 5:04 p.m. It also noted that the fishing would be poor, and it was.

I spent these 3 1/2 hours inside a minor feeder-creek arm on the north end of the reservoir. Except for two other boat anglers and one bank angler, I had this creek arm to myself.

The submerged terrain inside this creek arm consists of clay and gravel. The creek's shorelines are steep and bluff-like in the upper reaches of the creek arm and they become flatter in the middle and lower sections. Countless numbers of flooded bushes, submerged brush piles, partially-submerged laydowns, and submerged stumps adorn the shallows around the shorelines.

The water in the main-lake area outside of this creek arm was muddy with less than a foot of visibility. The surface temperature was 48 degrees. The water level was normal.

Inside the lower end of this creek arm, the water clarity exhibited five inches of visibility, and the surface temperature increased to 50 degrees. In the midsection of this creek arm, the water displayed 18 inches of visibility and the water temperature was 59 degrees.

During the first two hours that I plied the lower section of the creek arm, the black bass bite was nonexistent. I failed to garner any strikes.

In the midsection of the creek arm, it was a tad better, but it was still a chore for me to catch two largemouth bass, one white bass, and one bluegill. I spoke briefly with the two boat anglers who were leaving. They reported that they had caught two small white bass about an 1/8 of a mile further up the creek. After they left, I moved further up into the middle section of the creek arm, and during the next 90 minutes, I caught one white bass.

The two largemouth bass and the one bluegill were abiding in five to eight feet of water near the deep-water ends of two laydowns that were close to the main creek channel that courses along the center of the creek. The two white bass were caught along the edge of the creek channel in 10 to 12 feet of water.

A 2 1/2-inch Z-Man's pearl Slim SwimZ affixed to a blue 1/15-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig that was employed with a slow and steady swimming retrieve allured the two white bass. A slow hop and bounce retrieve with a shortened four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ rigged on a red 1/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead allured the two largemouth bass and the bluegill.

Since the fishing was so dismal, I decided not to waste any time in the upper end of this creek arm. I failed to entice any largemouth bass or white bass with several other Midwest finesse offerings.

Jan. 9

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 9 with Jason Marlow at a highland reservoir in northeastern Tennessee.

Here is an edited version of his log.

The nearest National Weather Service site reported that it was 32 degrees at 5:35 a.m. and 30 degrees at 2:35 p.m. The sky was overcast. The wind was calm, and when it stirred, it was variable at times, and it also angled out of the north and northeast at 5 to 12 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.09 at 12:35 a.m., 30.15 at 5:35 a.m., 30.24 at 11:35 a.m., and 30.23 at 2:35 p.m.

The water level was 20.57 feet below full pool. The surface temperature was 48 degrees. The water exhibited eight to 10 feet of visibility.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the best times to fish occurred from 6:54 a.m. to 8:54 a.m. and 7:22 p.m. to 9:22 p.m.

We fished from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the upper section of a feeder-creek arm.

We managed to catch 17 smallmouth bass and two largemouth bass during this four hour and thirty-minute outing.

We focused primarily on the 45-degree and rock-laden shorelines.

We used a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig.

Once we made our way out of the marina, we started fishing around a clay-and-mud-laden point and worked our way to a 45-degree and rock-laden shoreline. We fished roughly 500 yards of this shoreline. It yielded three smallmouth bass. They were caught in water shallower than 10 feet by dragging the rig slowly on the bottom and pausing it for 10 to 15 seconds, and then we would repeat the routine until we determined it was out of what anglers call the catching zone.

We made a short move to the other side of this feeder-creek arm, where we fished a stretch of a shoreline similar to the one we had just fished. The only difference is this stretch has more laydowns. It yielded eight smallmouth bass on our PB&J Finesse TRD rigs. Jason caught five of the eight on a deadstick presentation, and I caught three on the drag-and-pause presentation. They were caught in less than 10 feet of water.

After we worked another point, we fished along another shoreline, where we fished for about an hour without eliciting a strike.

We decided to finish the outing around the marina, which is nestled in the back of a long cove. These shorelines are not as steep as what we had been fishing in the feeder-creek arm. They are mostly clay and adorned with isolated rocks and veins of rocks.

This is not an area I usually fish this time of year, but I was not prepared for the temperature to not get above freezing, and at this point, I was just trying to get back to the truck and warm up.

As we fished our way to the truck, we caught two largemouth bass around isolated laydowns. They were caught in less than five feet of water and abiding around the base of the laydown where it entered the water. We caught them on the initial drop of our rigs.

We caught six smallmouth bass around isolated and shallow rocks and the concrete anchors that held the cables for the floating homes. They were caught on the drag-and- pause technique.

A lot of the black bass that we caught had crayfish in their gullets. And during this time of year, I am targeting black bass that are foraging on crayfish. And rock-laden shorelines are traditionally the most fruitful areas.

Jan. 12

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log about their short outing to one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs on Jan. 12, and it was their first one in 2021.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 24 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 55 degrees at 1:52 p.m. The sky was fair. The wind angled out of the west and southwest at 3 to 13 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.19 at 12:52 a.m., 30.17 at 5:52 a.m., 30.17 at 11:52 a.m., and 30.19 at 4:52 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would occur from 9:24 a.m. to 11:24 a.m., 9:54 p.m. to 11:54 p.m., and 3:08 a.m. to 5:08 a.m.

We were afloat from 2:55 p.m. to 4:20 p.m., and fished for 75 minutes.

Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited from six to 10 feet of visibility. The surface temperature was 38 degrees. The water level looked to be about six inches below its normal level. About one percent of this reservoir was covered with a thin sheet of ice.

Significant patches of submerged aquatic vegetation, such as bushy pondweed and coontail, used to grace many acres of this reservoirs' shallow-water flats, but that is not the case this winter. Across many winters of fishing, we have found that the lack of bountiful and heathy patches of submerged aquatic vegetation usually creates some very trying times for Midwest finesse anglers in their pursuit of largemouth bass. And we found that to be the case on this winter outing.

We spent most of the 75 minutes probing patches of coontail that adorn portions of a massive shallow-water flat in the back of one of the reservoir's primary feeder-creek arms. It yielded three largemouth bass.

One largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD HogZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-subtle-shake presentation.

The other two were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TricklerZ rigged on a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. One was caught on a drag-and-deadstick presentation, and the other largemouth bass was caught on a slow swimming presentation.

They were caught in five to eight feet of water around patches of coontail that grace the edges of a submerged creek channel that zigzags across this shallow-water flat.

We probed a small segment of a shallow-water flat and a submerged creek-channel in the back of another major feeder-creek arm. It is graced with some meager patches of coontail. We failed to elicit a strike.

Most of the inside areas of a small feeder-creek arm was covered with ice. We spent a few minutes probing the outside edges of the ice and failed to garner a strike.

Jan. 13

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log about their outing to one of northeastern Kansas' community reservoirs on Jan. 13.

Here is an edited version of their log.

Our original intentions were to fish at one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs, but when we arrived at this reservoir, we were surprised to see that much of the lower portions of this reservoir were covered with ice, and its only boat ramp was covered with ice. Therefore, we decided to venture to a nearby community reservoir.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 28 degrees at 6:52 a.m. and 57 degrees at 1:52 p.m. The sky was fair. The wind was calm at times, and when it blew, it angled out of the east, south and southwest at 3 to 21 mph. The barometric pressure was 30.06 at 12:52 a.m., 29.95 at 5:52 a.m., 29.81 at 11:52 a.m., and 29.72 at 1:52 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would occur from 10:22 a.m. to 12:22 p.m.,10:51 p.m. to 12:51 a.m., and 4:08 a.m. to 6:08 a.m.

We fished from 11:15 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited from five to eight feet of visibility. This reservoir has been fouled by an ugly algae bloom for months on end, and we were delighted to see that the bloom had finally ended. The surface temperature ranged from 37 to 38 degrees. The water level looked to be more than 12 inches below its normal level. About 10 percent of one large feeder-creek arm was covered with a thin sheet of ice.

We caught two largemouth bass inside the large feeder-creek arm that was covered with a thin sheet of ice. They were caught along a shoreline about 50 percent of the way inside this arm. This shoreline has a 35- to 45-degree slope. Its underwater terrain consists of gravel, rocks, and some humongous boulders; this terrain is embellished with some stumps, brush piles, and laydowns. Much of its flat and shallow-water terrain used to be adorned with significant patches of Eurasian milfoil, but the managers of this reservoir have worked off and on for the past eight years to kill these patches with a variety of herbicides, and they have succeeded. It looks as if they have killed the patches of curly-leaf pondweed, too. The eradication of these macrophytes has played havoc with Midwest finesse anglers' abilities to find and catch significant numbers of largemouth bass during the winter. In fact, the demise of Eurasian milfoil parallels the decline of the largemouth bass fishing throughout the calendar year at this reservoir.

One of these two largemouth bass was caught adjacent to a dock in about eight feet of water on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TricklerZ rigged on a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-deadstick presentation.

The second one was caught on the TRD TricklerZ rig while strolling in seven to 11 feet of water and employing a drag-and-shake presentation around rocks and boulders.

We failed to garner a strike along a similar shoreline inside a small feeder-creek arm.

We caught five largemouth bass along several flat and shallow sections of a shoreline that is situated about halfway to three-quarters of the way inside a major feeder-creek arm. The underwater terrains of these sections consist of gravel, rocks, and silt, and there might be a few meager patches of Eurasian milfoil adorning a few spots along this underwater terrain. These shorelines possess a 30- to 40-degree slope. They are littered with six docks, some laydowns, and a few manmade brush piles.

Two of the largemouth bass were caught adjacent to two of the docks on the TRD TicklerZ rig with a drag-and-deadstick presentation in about nine feet of water.

The other three were caught on the TRD TicklerZ rig with a drag-and-shake presentation in five to seven feet of water around areas that might be embellished with a touch of Eurasian milfoil, but we failed to actually feel our rigs crossing paths with any patches of milfoil.

In sum, it was our second trying cold-water outing in 2021. In the days, weeks, months, and perhaps years to come, we are hoping to garner the help of other anglers and environmentalists to educate our reservoirs' managers and fisheries biologists about the need for them to learn how to cultivate patches of aquatic vegetation – even vegetation that is castigated as invasive, such as Eurasian milfoil. And when those patches of vegetation need to be cut and maintained, the managers and biologists need to form a consortium and jointly purchase the proper harvesting machinery from a company like Aquarius Systems (http://www.aquarius-systems.com/). By forming a consortium, the managers of the community and state reservoirs can share the same machinery for years on end at a very reasonable cost. And by regularly and wisely cultivating the aquatic vegetation rather than poisoning it and polluting the environments in and around these reservoirs, the managers and biologists will create fruitful waterways for anglers to fish from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31.

Jan. 16

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Jan. 16 outing at

two community reservoirs. These reservoirs are populated with Florida-strain largemouth bass and perhaps hybridized largemouth bass, which are very difficult to catch in cold water.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Talban Kantala of Carrollton, Texas, is moving to Somerville, South Carolina, in a few days, and he joined Bill Kenny of Corinth, Texas, and me at a municipal reservoir that is situated in a community north of Dallas.

The sky was partly cloudy for most of the day, but it became overcast around 4:00 p.m. The morning low temperature was 37 degrees, and the afternoon high temperature peaked at 57 degrees. The average low temperature in north-central Texas for Jan. 16 is 35 degrees and the average high is 56 degrees. A mild-mannered wind blew out of the west-by-northwest at 5 to 10 mph. The barometric pressure measured 30.16 at noon and dropped to 30.03 by 4:00 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar table noted that the best fishing would occur from 12:52 a.m. to 2:52 a.m., 7:04 a.m. to 9:04 a.m., and 1:16 p.m. to 3:16 p.m.

The three of us were afoot at this reservoir from about 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

The water exhibited about 12 inches of visibility. The water temperature was 46.4 degrees. The water level was normal.

Normally, when the water temperature is this cold, it is an extremely tough challenge to generate any strikes from the Florida-strain largemouth bass that are stocked in this impoundment. We plied the most high-percentage areas such as main-lake points, steep shorelines, and a small feeder-creek arm in the north end of this reservoir, and we failed to catch or garner any strikes from a largemouth bass.

We did manage to provoke a few subtle strikes in a small pool located in the upper portion of the feeder creek. But those strikes displayed the characteristics of small bluegill and green sunfish, and we failed to hook any of them.

After we finished fishing the first community reservoir, Talban had to leave, so Bill and I decided to travel 15 miles to another municipal reservoir. We fished at the second one from about 1:40 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

The water temperature at the second reservoir was 47.8 degrees. The water level was normal. The water displayed about 14 inches of clarity.

The south end of this impoundment is comprised of a decorative concrete and stone dam. The submerged terrain along the base of the dam is covered with softball-size rocks. We dissected this area with several of Z-Man's Midwest finesse rigs, but we were unable to generate any strikes there.

We caught six largemouth bass and inadvertently caught two large bluegills along the east shoreline. This shoreline is the steepest of the four shorelines, and it is endowed with two primary points and three tertiary points. Five of the six largemouth bass were caught near the two primary points and one of the three tertiary points in four to six feet of water. Three were caught on a 2 3/4-inch Z-Man's black-blue TRD TubeZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead and a slow drag-shake-and-deadstick presentation. Two were caught on an extremely slow drag-and-deadstick retrieve with a four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ matched with a red 1/32-ounce OG Mushroom Jighead. A 1/15-ounce Z-Man's BulletZ jighead dressed with a Z-Man's mood-ring Finesse TRD attracted one largemouth bass as it fell from the top of an offshore ledge into deeper water.

At about 2:40 p.m., Bill had to leave, and I remained until 4:10 p.m. plying the remainder of this reservoir.

I failed to elicit any strikes from a shallow mudflat that occupies 90 percent of the northern shoreline or from a small feeder creek that enters the reservoir at the west end of this shoreline.

After that, I slowly dissected the west side of the reservoir, which is endowed with a submerged clay and gravel ledge and three small points, and I caught two more largemouth bass. Both of these largemouth bass were caught from the deep-water side of the ledge in four to six feet of water with a slow drag-and-deadstick presentation with the four-inch black-neon Finesse WormZ combo.

In closing, the fishing was wretched at the first reservoir, where we failed to catch a largemouth bass. The second one was more fruitful. We had to work slowly in order to catch eight largemouth bass and two large bluegills from the second reservoir.

The four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ rig and a slow drag-and-deadstick presentation allured four of the eight largemouth bass and one of the two bluegills.

The 2 3/4-inch Z-Man's black-blue TRD TubeZ and a slow drag-shake-and-deadstick retrieve tempted three largemouth bass.

The Z-Man's mood-ring Finesse TRD combo caught one largemouth bass as it was settling to the bottom after it was pulled off the side of an offshore ledge, and it also caught one bluegill with a drag-and-deadstick retrieve.

I don't have a clue as to why we were unable to catch a single largemouth bass at the first reservoir, but we were able to catch eight largemouth bass at the second one. In my eyes, their underwater terrains appear to be identical. And with both of their water temperatures hovering at 46 and 47 degrees, I am amazed that we were able to catch anything at all.

Jan. 17

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 17 with Adam Smith from Corryton, Tennessee.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Adam Smith and I fished the lower end of a Tennessee Valley Authority's highland reservoir in northeastern Tennessee from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

We had an overnight low temperature of 36 degrees and a daytime high temperature of 43 degrees. The sky fluctuated from being mostly cloudy to partly cloudy. The wind angled out of the west at 15 to 20 mph.

The water level was 20.41 feet below full pool. The water exhibited 10 to 12 feet of visibility. The surface temperature was 44 degrees.

According to the In-Fisherman solunar calendar, the best fishing would occur from 1:53 a.m. to 3:53 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.

I was really looking forward to fishing today, and I thought the weather conditions would be ideal. We caught 19 smallmouth bass and eight largemouth bass in six hours, which is an hourly average of 4.5 black bass.

Our plan was to use the Z-Man's TRD TubeZ. But upon arriving at the ramp, we quickly switched to plan B because I left the TubeZs on the kitchen counter. So, our rigs for this outing were the Z-Man's Finesse TRD in the PB&J and molting-craw hues. We affixed them to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a number two hook.

We fished rock-laden shorelines that possess a 45-degree slope and are scattered with laydowns. They can vary in length from a few hundred yards to more than a mile. These shorelines allow the black bass to change depths quickly without using a lot of energy and also hold the highest concentration of exposed crayfish, which translates to the greatest numbers of feeding black bass. We try and keep the boat in 30 to 40 feet of water and work our rigs down the shoreline until we can get an idea of what depth the black bass are abiding and feeding in.

From the boat ramp, we made a short run to a main-lake shoreline, where I caught a smallmouth bass on my first cast with the PB&J rig in about 10 feet of water with a drag-and-pause presentation. This shoreline and drag-and-pause presentation yielded three more smallmouth bass. Two were caught on the PB&J rig, and one was caught on the molting-craw rig.

Our second stop was a main-lake shoreline that is more than a mile long. Everything about this shoreline looked right in our eyes, but we only caught two smallmouth bass. One was caught on the PB&J rig, and the other one was caught on the molting-craw rig. The wind was blowing so hard that I am not sure the rigs were even reaching the bottom, and it was difficult to maintain contact with our rigs

Our stop number three wasn't planned. I was trying to choke down my own PB&J sandwich while we were idling around and we came across a large school of what turned out to be largemouth bass. I made a couple passes over them and dropped a buoy marker on each end of the school. These markers make life a lot easier when fishing offshore in high winds. The bass were in about 20 feet of water and abiding in what looked like a ditch on the graphs. I positioned the boat so we could cast our rigs past the school and bring the rigs to them instead of throwing on top of them. We tried the Z-Man's The Deal Slim SwimZ and Z-Man's The Deal Baby Goat affixed to a Z-Man's black 1/6-ounce Finesse ShroomZ jig with a slow swimming presentation near the bottom. But neither rig elicited a strike. Then we affixed the PB&J Finesse TRD and molting-craw Finesse TRD to the black 1/6-ounce jig. The PB&J rig caught eight largemouth bass on a slow crawling or dragging presentation through the school. The molting-craw rig failed to catch a fish. These largemouth bass were about two-pounders.

We fished our fourth and last stop twice. It was another main-lake and rock-laden shoreline with a 45-degree slope and adorned with a few scattered laydowns. It is about 500 yards long. The wind and waves were hitting it head on. We caught 13 smallmouth bass and lost several larger ones at the boat. The smallmouth bass were not eating aggressively today, and we could not determine what was going on.

These 13 smallmouth bass were caught on our Z-Man's Finesse TRD rigs in the PB&J and molting-craw hues affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig. Adam caught eight on the molting-craw rig using the drag-and-pause technique in 10 to 15 feet of water. I caught five on the PB&J rig by slowly crawling it along the bottom in 10 to 15 feet of water.

Jan. 21

Ned and Pat Kehde of Lawrence, Kansas, posted a log about their outing to one of northeastern Kansas' state reservoirs on Jan. 21.

Here is an edited version of their log.

The National Weather Service reported that it was 24 degrees at 7:53 a.m. and 59 degrees at 3:53 p.m. The sky was fair. The wind was calm for nine hours, and when it stirred, it angled out of the north, southwest, west, and northwest at 3 to 7 mph. The barometric pressure was 29.96 at 12:53 a.m., 29.98 at 5:53 a.m., 29.97 at 11:53 a.m., and 29.92 at 3:53 p.m.

In-Fisherman's solunar calendar noted that the best fishing would occur from 4:35 a.m. to 6:35 a.m., 4:56 p.m. to 6:56 p.m., and 10:46 a.m. to 12:46 p.m.

We fished from 11:53 a.m. to 2:40 p.m.

We attempted to fish this reservoir on Jan. 13, but when we arrived at the boat ramp, we were surprised to see that much of the lower portions of this reservoir were covered with ice, and its only boat ramp was covered with ice. So, we ventured to a nearby community reservoir that was ice-free.

On our Jan. 21 outing, about five percent of this state reservoir was covered with ice, and this ice was located in the back portions of two of its primary feeder-creek arms.

Our secchi stick revealed that the water exhibited about eight feet of visibility. The surface temperature ranged from 36 to 38 degrees. The water level looked to be more than 12 inches below its normal level.

We spent about 10 minutes trying to break the ice in the back of one of the primary feeder-creek arms. And after that ice-breaking foray, we spent 35 minutes dissecting about a 175-yard stretch of a main-lake shoreline that is graced with a submerged creek channel. We failed to garner a strike.

We spent the next 65 minutes probing a shallow-water flat in the back of a secondary feeder-creek arm that was mostly ice-free. This flat is covered with three to seven feet of water. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are covered with silt, and there are patches of wilted brittle naiad adorning some of this terrain. There is also a tattered beaver hut. In an area about half of the size of a football field, we caught 15 largemouth bass. One of those 15 largemouth bass was caught on a Z-Man's meat-dog TRD MinnowZ affixed to a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead with a drag-and-shake presentation in about five feet of water. The other 14 largemouth bass were caught on a Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ affixed to a red 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. One of the 14 was caught on the initial drop of the rig adjacent to the beaver hut in about three feet of water. The other 13 were caught on either a drag-and-shake presentation or a drag-and-deadstick presentation in four to six feet of water.

We spent about 15 minutes quickly fishing the shallow-water flat in the back of a tertiary feeder-creek arm, which possesses an underwater terrain that consists of gravel and rocks that are covered with silt, patches of wilted brittle naiad, a massive beaver hut, scores of stumps, and an array of laydown. This flat is covered with three to seven feet of water. We failed to elicit a strike on this flat.

We spent the final 55 minutes fishing portions of a shallow-water flat in the back of the primary feeder-creek arm that spent 10 minutes breaking up the ice, and about 50 percent of the ice had disappeared, but the ice remained over the area that we were hoping to fish. Thus, we probed an area about the size of one and a half football fields, and a tad of it was ice-covered. The underwater terrain consists of gravel and rocks that are covered with silt. This flat was covered with four to five feet of water. It is embellished with a few patches of wilted brittle naiad. A beaver hut that is about 20 feet by 20 feet graces a portion of the north side of this shallow-water flat. Several laydowns also adorn it. Our TRD MinnowZ rig caught one largemouth bass with a drag-and-shake presentation in about four feet of water. Our TRD TicklerZ rigs caught 16 largemouth bass in 3 1/2 to five feet of water; one was caught on the initial drop, two were caught on a swim-glide-and-subtle-shake presentation; six were caught on a drag-and-shake presentation; seven were caught on a drag-and-deadstick presentation. Six of these largemouth bass were caught in the vicinity of the beaver hut.

In sum, we caught 32 largemouth bass in two hours and 37 minutes. Our Z-Man's green-pumpkin TRD TicklerZ rigs inveigled 30 largemouth bass.

According to the National Weather Service, the next six days are forecasted to be rather wintery, and we suspect most of our nearby largemouth bass reservoirs will become partially covered with too much ice for us to fish.

Jan. 24

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 24 with Adam Smith from Corryton, Tennessee.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Adam and I fished the lower end of a Tennessee Valley Authority's highland reservoir in northeastern Tennessee from 10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

The air temperature at 10:30 a.m. was 34 degrees, and it was 40 degrees at 4:00 p.m. The day started out with partly sunny skies and switched to mostly cloudy with intermittent showers. Around 1:00 p.m., a steady breeze blew out of the west.

The water level was 20.41 feet below full pool. The water exhibited more than 12 feet of visibility. The surface temperature was 46 degrees.

According to the In-Fisherman solunar calendar, the best fishing would occur from 6:53 a.m. to 8:53 a.m., 7:17 p.m. to 9:17 p.m., and 12:40 a.m. to 2:40 a.m.

We were fishing just ahead of a cold front, which I thought would activate the black bass, but it seemed to have the opposite effect. It was an absolute grind to catch 19 smallmouth bass and four largemouth bass in five and a half hours for a rate of roughly four black bass per hour.

The finesse rigs that we used were a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD, Z-Man's bubble-gut Finesse TRD, Z-Man's green-pumpkin Finesse TRD, Z-Man's smelt Finesse TRD, and Z-Man's PB&J TRD TubeZ. The green-pumpkin Finesse TRD was affixed to a red 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a number-two hook. The others were affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a number-two hook.

I am not really sure what was going on today. The fish just were not biting like I thought they would ahead of a cold front. The ends of bluff walls were where most of our fish came from this trip.

We began the outing by fishing a long stretch of a rock-laden shoreline with a 45-degree slope. Three smallmouth bass were caught on the PB&J Finesse TRD rig and one was caught on the green-pumpkin Finesse TRD rig. They were caught in five to 20 feet of water with a drag-and-pause technique and quivering the rod tip during the pause.

We spent the next hour fishing four different main-lake points without a bite.

Then we ventured to a bluff. We started where the rock-laden and 45-degree shoreline transitioned to the bluff, and we caught three smallmouth bass and two largemouth bass around the transition. Both of the largemouth bass were caught on the bubble-gut Finesse TRD rig by dragging it on the bottom slowly in about 15 feet of water. The three smallmouth bass were caught in about 15 feet of water by deadsticking the PB&J Finesse TRD rig. We continued fishing along the bluff without another bite. But we caught one smallmouth bass where this bluff made a transition with another rock-laden shoreline with a 45-degree slope, and it was caught on the bubble-gut Finesse TRD rig with a dragging presentation in 10 feet of water.

There was a marina nearby that had some houseboats that were sitting on a deep point. That was our next stop. We fished the backside of the houseboats and managed to catch two smallmouth bass. One was caught by deadsticking the smelt Finesse TRD rig in 10 feet of water. The second one was caught on the initial drop of the green-pumpkin Finesse TRD rig underneath one of the houseboats. We fished around in the marina for a while, but we failed to get a bite. So, we moved to another bluff.

At the ends of this bluff, we caught two largemouth bass and 10 smallmouth bass. Adam caught two largemouth bass on the bubble-gut Finesse TRD by dragging it along the bottom; one was caught in about 40 feet of water, and the other one was caught in about 10 feet of water. He also landed three smallmouth bass by deadsticking the bubble-gut Finesse TRD rig in five to 10 feet of water. I caught seven smallmouth bass. Five were caught on the PB&J Finesse TRD rig with a drag-and-pause presentation in about 10 feet of water. Two were caught on the PB&J TRD TubeZ with a hopping presentation in 10 feet of water. We caught nine of those fish at the transition of the bluff to a rock-laden shoreline with a 45-degree slope, and three were caught at the transition of the bluff to a shallower clay-laden shoreline.

Jan. 25

Bill Kenney of Denton, Texas, posted this brief on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 25.

Here is an edited version of his brief.

From 3:40 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., I fished at a private reservoir in north-central Texas that was impounded in 2018. This impoundment has depths ranging from a shallow shelf that is covered with about two feet of water to a submerged creek channel that is covered with 16 to 18 feet of water.

Jan. 25 was by far the warmest day we have had in the past three weeks. The daytime high reached a wonderful 70 degrees after a rainy weekend with overnight thunderstorms. When I made my first cast, the air temperature was 67 degrees and the wind quartered out of the west-northwest at a steady 11 mph. The low morning temperature was 52 degrees. The barometric pressure was 29.78.

The In-Fisherman solunar calendar noted that the optimum fishing periods would take place from 8:58 a.m. to 10:58 a.m. and 9:24 p.m. to 11:24 p.m.

This impoundment was stocked during a six-month period in the summer and fall of 2018 with largemouth bass, catfish, and bluegill that were caught elsewhere. This was the first time that the owner had allowed anyone to fish his impoundment. He was not confident that I would catch anything of substance, but he was also interested in knowing how the fish had progressed since being stocked.

The clay bottom of this impoundment was visible down to about three feet. I was surprised to discover that the water temperature was 54 degrees.

There are large patches of dormant pondweed that extend about 20 feet out from the water's edge, which made fishing with a traditional mushroom-head jig difficult. Because I didn't have sufficient knowledge of the underwater objects, I elected to use a 1/15-ounce Z-Man's green-pumpkin BulletZ jig with a variety of Z-Man's Midwest finesse soft plastics.

I fished the south shoreline, which is adorned with oak trees along the water's edge and a couple of laydowns.

I also plied the east shoreline, which is endowed with a prominent point that protrudes out into the deepest water in the impoundment.

I threw my first few casts toward open water and tried to let the wind drift my Z-Man's molting-craw Finesse TRD close to the edge of a partially-submerged tree. I caught a one-pound largemouth bass on my second cast and a 4.2-pound largemouth bass on my third cast. Both of these bass were caught along the bottom in about eight feet of water.

I continued probing the edges of the submerged tree and surrounding patches of pondweed using a hop-and-deadstick retrieve. In the first 30 minutes of fishing, I was able to land six largemouth bass, including a second largemouth that weighed over four pounds, while I was employing the Z-Man's molting-craw Finesse TRD rig.

I got snagged near the laydown and switched to a Z-Man's coppertruese Finesse TRD that was rigged weedless on a 1/15-ounce green-pumpkin BulletZ jighead.

The coppertreuse Finesse TRD combo and a hop-and-deadstick presentation enticed six more largemouth bass during the next 30 minutes, which brought my catch rate to 12 largemouth bass in one hour. During this hour, I had only worked about 35 yards of the south shoreline. I continued to the east shoreline and caught three more largemouth bass that were abiding in six to eight feet of water.

When I reached the prominent point and started fishing the deeper part of the reservoir, I switched to a Googan Baits' Rattlin' Ned in the New Money hue. My thinking was that some sound and a darker color might be beneficial in the deeper and darker water. This section produced four largemouth bass, but I think I was in the nursery because they were all smaller specimens that weighed a half-pound or less. The bites tapered off as darkness began to settle in and the wind became calm.

In total, I landed 19 largemouth bass in less than two hours. This is considered a banner day in north-central Texas during January. I attribute it to several factors: warmer than normal water temperature, a light breeze to break up the water's surface, a relatively new reservoir where the bass have not seen any artificial lures, and a great aquatic ecosystem. We don't get many days or opportunities like this around the Dallas and Ft. Worth metropolitan areas.

Steve Reideler of Denton and I are looking forward to more days on this impoundment as the weather begins to warm this spring.

Jan. 30

Brandon Marlow of LaFollette, Tennessee, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his outing on Jan. 30 with Jason Marlow.

Here is an edited version of his log.

Jason Marlow and I fished the lower end of a Tennessee Valley Authority's highland reservoir from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

When we arrived at the boat ramp, the air temperature was 19 degrees, and when we left, it was 27 degrees. The sky was cloudy. The wind was calm, but it began to blow about 30 minutes before we left.

The water level was 18.37 feet below full pool. The surface temperature was 43 degrees. The water exhibited about 10 feet of visibility.

According to the In-Fisherman solunar calendar, the best times to fish where between 11:33 a.m. and 1:33 p.m., 11:59 p.m. and 1:59 a.m., and 5:46 a.m. and 7:46 a.m.

We fished an area of the reservoir where a feeder-creek arm joins the river channel. We focused primarily on three different spots. Two of them were long-tapering points that fell into the river channel. The third one was a bluff that bottoms out into the channel of the feed creek.

We caught 13 bass black; seven smallmouth bass, five largemouth bass, and one spotted bass.

Jason used a 1/8-ounce Z-Man's green-pumpkin ShroomZ Micro Finesse Jig with a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD as a trailer. I used a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/10-ounce Z-Man's Finesse ShroomZ jig. These two rigs caught 12 of the 13 black bass.

No wind makes the black bass fishing at this highland reservoir difficult --especially in the winter. But no wind makes deep-water fishing easier, which is what we did most of the time on this outing. And 12 of the 13 black bass were caught in more than 30 feet of water.

I normally do not like to use anything over a 1/16-ounce jig, but the heavier jig allowed the Finesse TRD rig to get into the deep-water lairs quickly, and it allowed me to feel it better.

We started fishing in shallow water around the first point. I used the Garmin Panoptix Livescope System to scan the point as we fished. The one school I was able to locate was sitting on the steeper side of the point where it dropped into the river channel. These fish were pretty tightly grouped together. We spent roughly 30 minutes fishing around this school from different angles, but we failed to elicit a strike. So, we moved to the bluff.

We made four passes down a roughly 100-yard stretch of this bluff. This section was unique because it bottomed out into the channel of the feeder creek and 40 feet of water. We caught 11 bass black. All of them seemed to be tight against the base of the bluff. If we failed to get the rig within a couple of feet of the bluff, we were out of the strike zone. We suspected that these black bass were not in a chasing mood. When our rigs reached the bottom, we tried not to move them much. We would let them sit for 10 to 15 seconds. Jason caught four smallmouth bass and two largemouth bass, and he said he never felt any of them hit. He would begin to reel his rig in, and they would be on. I caught three largemouth bass and two smallmouth bass. I was able to detect the strikes by holding my rod tip high and watching the line where it entered the water. These black bass were not swimming off with it; it was just a slight tick in the line that was the giveaway that a fish had engulfed the rig.

At the second long-tapering point, I caught the only spotted bass by dragging my Finesse TRD in 35 to 40 feet of water. The Garmin Panoptix Livescope System pinpointed what looked like an isolated rock pile. I made a cast past it and worked the rig to it. That was where the spotted bass was abiding. It hit while I was dragging the bait and was above average size for this reservoir. We made several casts without eliciting another strike.

When the wind finally picked up, we fished a shallow clay shoreline that is endowed with scattered rocks. We were running out of time; so, we fished it a little quicker than we would have liked to fish it. But a Z-Man's PB&J Finesse TRD affixed to a green-pumpkin 1/16-ounce mushroom-style jig with a number-two hook managed to catch a smallmouth bass on a drag-and-pause presentation in 10 feet of water.

I really enjoy finesse fishing in deep water. It's not something I get to do often. It is something I am looking to expand on in the future.

Jan. 30

Steve Reideler of Denton, Texas, posted a log on the Finesse News Network about his Jan. 30 outing.

Here is an edited version of his log.

From noon to 5:00 p.m., I fished at three small community reservoirs in the vicinity of Denton, Texas. This was my first outing since Bill Kenney of Denton and I fished together on Jan. 16.

It was a warm and blustery January day. It rained from about 5:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.; then the sky became cloudless. Around 4:00 p.m., an odd haze drifted in, which partially blocked the afternoon sunshine. The morning low temperature was 53 degrees. The afternoon high temperature climbed to 72 degrees. A problematic and robust wind quartered out of the south-by-southwest at 25 to 30 mph, with an occasional gust reaching 35 mph. The barometric pressure rose slightly from 29.69 to 29.70.

According to In-Fisherman's solunar calendar, the optimum fishing periods would take place from 5:38 a.m. to 7:38 a.m., 11:25 a.m. to 1:25 p.m., and 11:51 p.m. to 1:51 a.m. During this five-hour endeavor, I fished during four of them.

I began the outing at a community reservoir south of Denton.

Because of the early morning rain, the water was stained, exhibiting about 12 inches of clarity. The water level was about a foot high and a steady stream of water was flowing over the concrete spillway at the dam. I was encouraged to find that the water temperature was 53.8 degrees.

I started fishing at the south end of the reservoir, which encompasses a concrete and stone dam, a concrete spillway, two submerged rock piles, and a small brush pile. The bottom terrain along the base of the dam is covered with softball-size rocks. I failed to elicit any strikes from this area.

I caught three largemouth bass from the east shoreline. This shoreline has about a 30-degree slope. It is endowed with two primary points and three tertiary points. These largemouth bass were caught in four to six feet of water from the end of two of the three tertiary points and one of the primary points. Two of the three were caught on a drag-and-deadstick presentation with a four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ attached to a red 1/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The other largemouth bass was tempted by a drag-and-deadstick presentation with a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead sporting a 2 3/4-inch Z-Man's black-blue TRD TubeZ.

After that, I plied the west side of the reservoir which features one primary point, two tertiary points, and a long and shallow clay-and-gravel ledge that extends three to five feet out from the water's edge. This ledge is also adorned with three winter-dead patches of lily-pad stems.

I caught three more largemouth bass in three to five feet of water along the deep-water side of the shallow ledge and near two of the patches of lily-pad stems. They were enticed into striking the four-inch black-neon Finesse WormZ rig that was employed with a slow drag-and-deadstick retrieve at about a 45-degree angle to the ledge.

I failed to cross paths with any largemouth bass from a shallow mudflat that occupies most of the northern shoreline and from a small feeder creek that enters the reservoir at the west end of this shoreline.

After I finished plying this impoundment, I drove to a suburb a few miles east of Denton where I investigated two more community reservoirs.

The water temperature was 50.6 degrees in the first reservoir and it displayed about 2 1/2 feet of visibility. There are several patches of aquatic vegetation throughout this impoundment, but I failed to garner any strikes from this impoundment.

The water temperature at the second reservoir was slightly warmer at 51.8 degrees. The water displayed 18 inches of visibility. The water level appeared to be normal.

This reservoir's submerged terrain consists primarily of sand, gravel, and a few scattered fist-size rocks. Bald-cypress trees line portions of the water's edge, and some of their gnarly roots and "knees" protrude several feet out into the water.

Another bank angler was also fishing this reservoir, and as he was dissecting the east and south shorelines, I plied the west and northern ones.

I caught one largemouth bass along the west shoreline, and three largemouth bass from the northern shoreline. All four of them were caught in less than five feet of water and within 10 feet of the water's edge. They were allured by the four-inch black-neon Finesse WormZ combo and a slow drag-and-deadstick presentation.

All totaled, I caught 10 largemouth bass in four hours. Six were caught from the first community reservoir south of Denton, and four were caught from one of the two community reservoirs east of Denton. The other impoundment was unproductive.

I wielded a variety of Z-Man's Midwest finesse baits affixed on a variety of colors and sizes of Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jigheads. One of the 10 largemouth bass was caught on a 2 3/4-inch Z-Man's black-blue TRD TubeZ rigged on a blue 1/16-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead. The other nine were tempted by a four-inch Z-Man's black-neon Finesse WormZ matched with a red 1/32-ounce Z-Man's OG Mushroom Jighead.

Both of these lures were presented with an extremely slow drag-and-deadstick retrieve. The deadstick portion of the retrieve lasted about 10 to 15 seconds, and all of the strikes occurred during the deadstick portion of the presentation. The strikes were nothing more than the fish suddenly just being there. I failed to generate any strikes while employing a hop-and-bounce retrieve, a slow and steady swimming retrieve, a drag-and-shake retrieve, and a slow swim-glide-and-shake retrieve.

FIND A DEALER
See something you like? Need to re-stock? Find the dealer nearest you to get all our latest products.
RECENT NEWS
HeadlineZ

Z-Man Takes a 'Schmidt'

HeadlineZ

Systematic Soft Plastics Storage

HeadlineZ

Fishing Vibe Machine

HeadlineZ

Midwest Finesse Fishing: May 2021

HeadlineZ

Beast Mode for Big Bass

CONNECT WITH US
LIKE US
On Facebook
FOLLOW US
On Twitter
SUBSCRIBE TO
Our YouTube Channel
CHECK US OUT
On Instagram